A lot's happened since Piratbyrån went offline. Pirate parties have spread to France, and to some surprise, the United States. Since The Pirate Bay raids of May 31, the Swedish political organization “Piratpartiet” have enjoyed considerable success, as it numbers have grown to near 8,000 members.

Although Piratbyrån (The Bureau of Piracy) is not a political entity analogous to Piratpartiet, it carries considerable weight throughout Sweden. As one of the many websites that were forced offline during the May 31 raids, Piratbyrån nevertheless continued its work. The Bureau of Piracy helped organize pro-piracy demonstrations in Gothenburg and Stockholm, while continuing lectures on copyright issues (basically anything that didn’t require an Internet connection.) Unlike the Piratpartiet which seeks political office (and influences policy through such offices), Piratbyrån is more a grass roots organization which focuses on education and open debate.

The concept of such influential pro-piracy organizations may appear far-fetched, yet the work of Piratbyrån and Piratpartiet holds considerable influence on the Swedish government. Minister of Justice Thomas Bodström has recently indicated that he is willing to renegotiate the 2005 copyright reform laws, in an apparent concession to the Swedish government's handling of The Pirate Bay raids.

Now after 1.5 months of Internet banishment, Piratbyrån is once again online. The Swedish police didn't have a change of heart on the matter of confiscated data and sever equipment; rather new/borrowed/used equipment was likely used to resurrect the site.

"We can now retake our place as the foremost copycritical news source on the net," says Tobias Andersson from Piratbyrån. "Together with other news sites and blogs we make sure it will be impossible to miss all the exciting stuff that is happening on the area."

Source: http://www.slyck.com/news.php?story=1247