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Thread: P2P users hit with music lawsuits

  1. #1
    [news=]THE US record industry has filed a new series of complaints against American users of peer-to-peer software from Kazaa, Grokster and LimeWire.

    The move came two days after the US Supreme Court ruled networks such as Grokster may be held liable for infringement if they encourage people to make unauthorised copies of copyrighted songs, films or other content.
    Some 784 users were targeted in the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) complaints, for violation of copyright.

    The ruling in the closely watched "MGM v. Grokster" case gives a powerful tool to Hollywood and the music industry to crack down on distributors of technology designed to skirt copyright protection and make illegal copies.

    Mitch Bainwol, chairman and chief executive of the RIAA, which represents the US recording industry, said the ruling "provided a real shot in the arm to legitimate online music services and unanimously injected moral clarity into this debate".

    "If there was any doubt left, there should now be none - individuals who download music without permission are breaking the law," Mr Bainwol said.

    The RIAA has filed thousands of suits against music pirates since the September 2003 launch of its legal offensive.

    Critics of Monday's unanimous ruling by the Supreme Court, which sought to craft rules for fighting digital piracy in the biggest copyright case in two decades, had said it left murky guidelines that would lead to more litigation.

    The case was seen as the most important in the copyright area since the 1984 "Betamax" decision named for the Sony videocasette recorder, a case that provided immunity from liability for providers of technology that can be used for both legal and unauthorised copies.

    Last edited by tesco; 07-01-2005 at 01:31 AM.

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  3. News (Archive)   -   #2
    Hairbautt's Avatar *haircut
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  4. News (Archive)   -   #3
    sArA's Avatar Ex-Moderatererer
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Legal action for 784 file sharers
    BBC News Online, Friday, 1 July, 2005

    The music industry has announced a fresh series of legal actions against 784
    people they suspect of illegally downloading songs from the internet.

    The action is brought by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA),
    bringing the total number of actions to nearly 11,000.

    The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) has sued 90 file-sharers to date.

    Separately, 90 raids have been carried out around the world in a co-ordinated
    crackdown on internet piracy.

    Police in 12 countries have seized computers and made arrests in an attempt to
    disrupt the "warez" groups responsible for the majority of copyrighted
    material available illegally online.

    "We have shown law enforcement can find and prosecute those who try to use the
    internet to create piracy networks," said US attorney general Alberto

    "We believe that actions such as this are going to have a significant
    deterrent effect," he continued.

    Civil action

    The RIAA said its new legal actions targeted users of such peer-to-peer sites
    as Limewire, Bearshare and Grokster.

    The actions followed a Supreme Court ruling on Monday that said websites that
    allow people to download illegally could also be sued.

    "If there was any doubt left, there should now be none: individuals who
    download music without permission are breaking the law," said RIAA chairman
    Mitch Bainwol.

    One suspected law-breaker is 14-year-old Emily Price from Cheltenham, whose
    mother Sylvia has been threatened with a 2,500 fine by the BPI.

    Ms Price must pay up by Friday or face further fines or civil action.

    Last edited by tesco; 07-04-2005 at 10:47 PM.

  5. News (Archive)   -   #4
    Afronaut's Avatar Xenu
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    "We believe that actions such as this are going to have a significant
    deterrent effect," he continued.
    That would be no.
    They've done raids before and I dont see any declining on downloading.

    There's might be some "deterrect effect" for short period of time
    but remember what happend after Napster?

    Yes, what an deterrect effect that made.
    Spoiler: Show


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