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Thread: In the UK next year will be 1984

  1. #1
    vidcc's Avatar there is no god
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    From 2006 Britain will be the first country where every journey by every car will be monitored


    Britain is to become the first country in the world where the movements of all vehicles on the roads are recorded. A new national surveillance system will hold the records for at least two years.

    Using a network of cameras that can automatically read every passing number plate, the plan is to build a huge database of vehicle movements so that the police and security services can analyse any journey a driver has made over several years.

    The network will incorporate thousands of existing CCTV cameras which are being converted to read number plates automatically night and day to provide 24/7 coverage of all motorways and main roads, as well as towns, cities, ports and petrol-station forecourts.

    By next March a central database installed alongside the Police National Computer in Hendon, north London, will store the details of 35 million number-plate "reads" per day. These will include time, date and precise location, with camera sites monitored by global positioning satellites.

    Already there are plans to extend the database by increasing the storage period to five years and by linking thousands of additional cameras so that details of up to 100 million number plates can be fed each day into the central databank.

    Senior police officers have described the surveillance network as possibly the biggest advance in the technology of crime detection and prevention since the introduction of DNA fingerprinting.

    But others concerned about civil liberties will be worried that the movements of millions of law-abiding people will soon be routinely recorded and kept on a central computer database for years.

    The new national data centre of vehicle movements will form the basis of a sophisticated surveillance tool that lies at the heart of an operation designed to drive criminals off the road.

    In the process, the data centre will provide unrivalled opportunities to gather intelligence data on the movements and associations of organised gangs and terrorist suspects whenever they use cars, vans or motorcycles.

    The scheme is being orchestrated by the Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo) and has the full backing of ministers who have sanctioned the spending of £24m this year on equipment.

    More than 50 local authorities have signed agreements to allow the police to convert thousands of existing traffic cameras so they can read number plates automatically. The data will then be transmitted to Hendon via a secure police communications network.

    Chief constables are also on the verge of brokering agreements with the Highways Agency, supermarkets and petrol station owners to incorporate their own CCTV cameras into the network. In addition to cross-checking each number plate against stolen and suspect vehicles held on the Police National Computer, the national data centre will also check whether each vehicle is lawfully licensed, insured and has a valid MoT test certificate.

    "Every time you make a car journey already, you'll be on CCTV somewhere. The difference is that, in future, the car's index plates will be read as well," said Frank Whiteley, Chief Constable of Hertfordshire and chairman of the Acpo steering committee on automatic number plate recognition (ANPR).

    "What the data centre should be able to tell you is where a vehicle was in the past and where it is now, whether it was or wasn't at a particular location, and the routes taken to and from those crime scenes. Particularly important are associated vehicles," Mr Whiteley said.

    The term "associated vehicles" means analysing convoys of cars, vans or trucks to see who is driving alongside a vehicle that is already known to be of interest to the police. Criminals, for instance, will drive somewhere in a lawful vehicle, steal a car and then drive back in convoy to commit further crimes "You're not necessarily interested in the stolen vehicle. You're interested in what's moving with the stolen vehicle," Mr Whiteley explained.

    According to a strategy document drawn up by Acpo, the national data centre in Hendon will be at the heart of a surveillance operation that should deny criminals the use of the roads.

    "The intention is to create a comprehensive ANPR camera and reader infrastructure across the country to stop displacement of crime from area to area and to allow a comprehensive picture of vehicle movements to be captured," the Acpo strategy says.

    "This development forms the basis of a 24/7 vehicle movement database that will revolutionise arrest, intelligence and crime investigation opportunities on a national basis," it says.

    Mr Whiteley said MI5 will also use the database. "Clearly there are values for this in counter-terrorism," he said.

    "The security services will use it for purposes that I frankly don't have access to. It's part of public protection. If the security services did not have access to this, we'd be negligent."

    Britain is to become the first country in the world where the movements of all vehicles on the roads are recorded. A new national surveillance system will hold the records for at least two years.

    Using a network of cameras that can automatically read every passing number plate, the plan is to build a huge database of vehicle movements so that the police and security services can analyse any journey a driver has made over several years.

    The network will incorporate thousands of existing CCTV cameras which are being converted to read number plates automatically night and day to provide 24/7 coverage of all motorways and main roads, as well as towns, cities, ports and petrol-station forecourts.

    By next March a central database installed alongside the Police National Computer in Hendon, north London, will store the details of 35 million number-plate "reads" per day. These will include time, date and precise location, with camera sites monitored by global positioning satellites.

    Already there are plans to extend the database by increasing the storage period to five years and by linking thousands of additional cameras so that details of up to 100 million number plates can be fed each day into the central databank.
    source

    vital law enforcement tool or invasion of privacy? Is the trade off balanced?

    it’s an election with no Democrats, in one of the whitest states in the union, where rich candidates pay $35 for your votes. Or, as Republicans call it, their vision for the future.

  2. The Drawing Room   -   #2
    GepperRankins's Avatar we want your oil!
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    it kind of suxxors because it can be used to catch you speeding.

    i mean like my theory is, i can justify speeding if i'm aware enough not to get caught. so if a camera snaps you or a cop sees you. you obviously weren't concentrating on the surroundings and therefore weren't safe enough. but if they start sending people tickets because average speeds are too high, it's gonna be majorly unfair on competent drivers



    the apparent intentions sucks too, because vehicle identity theft is like the fastest growing crime in the UK. so any terrorists or murderers are just gonna have a laugh giving you false trails

  3. The Drawing Room   -   #3
    My first thought was "cool". If my car is stolen, we can just track where they took it.

    But how long will it take to develop a simple device which will either obscure the plates or act as a clip-on false plate that can change every 5 minutes.

    This leaves the average joe the only one whose moves have been tracked.

    Can a private eye access the database to catch a cheating spouse.

    I can't imagine the mudslinging in the next election with that sort of data available for political propaganda.

    Why are your plates seen at the liquor store or strip clubs so much. Also nice fodder for a lawyer working a case.

    I don't think I like it. I prefer my privacy over some supposed protection.

    5 minutes of thought, but open to revision.
    Last edited by hobbes; 12-23-2005 at 03:27 AM.
    Aren't we in the trust tree, thingey?

  4. The Drawing Room   -   #4
    Busyman's Avatar Use Logic Or STFU!!!
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    I don't like it but if you are in public you are in public.

    I remember some stink about camera monitoring of street before. People were raising the privacy flag. Guess what, you're outside.
    Silly bitch, your weapons cannot harm me. Don't you know who I am? I'm the Juggernaut, Bitchhhh!

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  5. The Drawing Room   -   #5
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
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    Those in the U.K. should not have a problem with this...it's a natural extension of the terrorist-born paranoia we're all living with.

    I doubt it would be in the works absent current circumstances.

    If they want next to install cameras in the cars, I'd start worrying; the Nose-picker's Rights League would surely gripe-I mean, if you can't hook a booger in the privacy of your own vehicle...
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

  6. The Drawing Room   -   #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Busyman
    I don't like it but if you are in public you are in public.

    I remember some stink about camera monitoring of street before. People were raising the privacy flag. Guess what, you're outside.
    So perhaps we should place a monitering tag under your skin that records your every movement when you're outside your home.

    After all, you are in the public.

    Just like any phone call you make, those cross public lines, right?

    The question is whether this "safety" measure outweighs ones' right to privacy.

    I would opt for personal privacy over personal monitering by Big Brother.

    I think the chance for misuse outweighs its legimate use.
    Last edited by hobbes; 12-23-2005 at 06:10 AM.
    Aren't we in the trust tree, thingey?

  7. The Drawing Room   -   #7
    zapjb's Avatar Computer Abuser BT Rep: +3
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    I like the title of this topic. "In the UK next year will be 1984" For those of you young ones. A must read is George Orwell's 1984.

  8. The Drawing Room   -   #8
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    Quote Originally Posted by zapjb
    I like the title of this topic. "In the UK next year will be 1984" For those of you young ones. A must read is George Orwell's 1984.
    Interestingly the title was created by the publishers, not the author. They thought the original (something like "The last man in Europe") was pish, so they changed it to "1984".

    Oh and please stop looking at things in isolation. The article vidtard copied and pasted is quite interesting, however reading it sans ECHR and RIPA is pointless.

  9. The Drawing Room   -   #9
    zapjb's Avatar Computer Abuser BT Rep: +3
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    JPaul, The title was just the year of publication 1948. And switched the last 2 digits.

  10. The Drawing Room   -   #10
    Mr JP Fugley's Avatar Frog Shoulder BT Rep: +4
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    Quote Originally Posted by zapjb
    JPaul, The title was just the year of publication 1948. And switched the last 2 digits.
    That makes sense.
    "there is nothing misogynistic about anything, stop trippin.
    i type this way because im black and from nyc chill son "

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