Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Does Britain need an independent Nuclear Deterrent?

  1. #1
    Barbarossa's Avatar mostly harmless
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Over here!
    Posts
    19,631
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/5103764.stm

    Gordon Brown has signalled that he wants to keep and renew Britain's independent nuclear deterrent.

    The Trident missile system and the Vanguard submarines which carry them need replacing by 2024 and a decision is set to be taken in the next year.

    Estimates of the cost vary from £10bn to £25bn, depending on what type of new missiles or submarines are chosen.

    Mr Brown's intervention has enraged critics, who say Trident has no use now the Soviet Cold War threat is over.

    Labour had a manifesto commitment to retain an independent nuclear deterrent but it only applies until the next general election.

    Mr Brown, seen as the most likely next prime minister, has sparked new debate on the issue by highlighting his personal commitment to replace Trident.

    In his Mansion House speech in the City of London, He said Britain would show a "national purpose" in protecting its security.

    "Strong in defence in fighting terrorism, upholding NATO, supporting our armed forces at home and abroad, and retaining our independent nuclear deterrent," he said.

    "In an insecure would we must and we will always have the strength to take all necessary long term decisions to ensure both stability and security."
    I don't really understand who exactly he thinks will be deterred

    It certainly didn't deter the 7/7 bombers, and it never deterred the IRA...

    Does the fact that the UK has nukes make us any safer than Germany or Japan? Or New Zealand?

    Maybe if we didn't keep poking sticks into wasps nests we wouldn't be so scared of getting stung...

    Also, Trident is hardly "independent" anyway, as it's bound under NATO rules, and it can only work with the help of American satellites, so we couldn't nuke the USA if they were ever to turn "rogue"

    I'm really surprised by the number of people on the BBC site that are welcoming the news, I just think the money could be better spent upgrading the conventional forces, what do people here think?

    Brits and "Johnny Foreigner" replies welcome

    Oh, here is the wiki regarding the current Trident system.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanguard_class_submarine

  2. The Drawing Room   -   #2
    Busyman's Avatar Use Logic Or STFU!!!
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Washington D.C.
    Posts
    13,839
    Nuclear missiles will deter other nuclear attacks. You should have them. There are nations at your backdoor that have or will have them them.


    Peace Johnny Foreigner
    Silly bitch, your weapons cannot harm me. Don't you know who I am? I'm the Juggernaut, Bitchhhh!

    Flies Like An Arrow, Flies Like An Apple
    ---12323---4552-----
    2133--STRENGTH--8310
    344---5--5301---3232

  3. The Drawing Room   -   #3
    DanB's Avatar Smoke weed everyday
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    London, so fuck y'all
    Age
    38
    Posts
    22,104
    yes.

  4. The Drawing Room   -   #4
    Your in the process of seeing a nuclear middle East if somethings not done. A delivery system (other then terrorist) can't be far behind. Although I think that your not number one on the hit list for the kid killers and throat cutters. You are definetly on the list. Unless your willing to swing away when it coes to the ME getting armed to the teeth with nukes. And are prepared to actually do something about it. This is going to be a reality for the EU. And it's going to come to flourish basically in your back yard

  5. The Drawing Room   -   #5
    Biggles's Avatar Looking for loopholes
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Scotland
    Age
    60
    Posts
    8,804
    The question is whether we replace Trident rather than should we have nuclear capability. It is perfectly possible to have land based missiles, Cruise type delivery systems and/or plane delivered bombs at a fraction of the cost of underwater systems. The UK, and Europe generally, is awash with nuclear facilities, enrichment plants and reprocessing plants. The ability to respond to a nuclear threat is well within the EU's grasp if and when required.

    However, do we need subs capable of delivering hundreds of warheads at enormous expense? The Trident system was designed as a response to the Cold War stand off, not a rogue ME state with a few warheads. There is fussing over the cost of the two proposed aircraft carriers which would give the Navy a far more potent capability at a quarter of the cost of replacing the Trident system.

    My view is that a Trident replacement is the wrong answer to the question of what is an appropriate defence capabilty for the future, unless the analysts are predicting a return to a Cold War stand off with an enemy, such as Russia or China, that has a similar capability to our own. I am unaware of this being the case. In which case I am slightly surprised that Gordon Brown has made such a judgement when he is keen to trim the defence budget in every other area.
    Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum


  6. The Drawing Room   -   #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Biggles
    The question is whether we replace Trident rather than should we have nuclear capability. It is perfectly possible to have land based missiles, Cruise type delivery systems and/or plane delivered bombs at a fraction of the cost of underwater systems. The UK, and Europe generally, is awash with nuclear facilities, enrichment plants and reprocessing plants. The ability to respond to a nuclear threat is well within the EU's grasp if and when required.

    However, do we need subs capable of delivering hundreds of warheads at enormous expense? The Trident system was designed as a response to the Cold War stand off, not a rogue ME state with a few warheads. There is fussing over the cost of the two proposed aircraft carriers which would give the Navy a far more potent capability at a quarter of the cost of replacing the Trident system.

    My view is that a Trident replacement is the wrong answer to the question of what is an appropriate defence capabilty for the future, unless the analysts are predicting a return to a Cold War stand off with an enemy, such as Russia or China, that has a similar capability to our own. I am unaware of this being the case. In which case I am slightly surprised that Gordon Brown has made such a judgement when he is keen to trim the defence budget in every other area.

    I think the general purpose of a sub based platform is that it can't be targeted, except by another sub. It gives you the possibillity of stealth mobil retaliation point for worse case scenarios. I think to limit your sea capabilities is short sighted. I agree you may not need an entire arsenal of trident platforms. But these same systems can be fitted with non nuclear warheads. But in the end it is what it is, a deterent. I see no reason why there needs to be a replacement of the entire fleet. But I definetly think there is a need for a presence in this area. There's got to be a middle ground to be found. Update and retorfit half the fleet, replace the other half for your long term recon and deterent value.

  7. The Drawing Room   -   #7
    Biggles's Avatar Looking for loopholes
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Scotland
    Age
    60
    Posts
    8,804
    Quote Originally Posted by calm2chaos
    Quote Originally Posted by Biggles
    The question is whether we replace Trident rather than should we have nuclear capability. It is perfectly possible to have land based missiles, Cruise type delivery systems and/or plane delivered bombs at a fraction of the cost of underwater systems. The UK, and Europe generally, is awash with nuclear facilities, enrichment plants and reprocessing plants. The ability to respond to a nuclear threat is well within the EU's grasp if and when required.

    However, do we need subs capable of delivering hundreds of warheads at enormous expense? The Trident system was designed as a response to the Cold War stand off, not a rogue ME state with a few warheads. There is fussing over the cost of the two proposed aircraft carriers which would give the Navy a far more potent capability at a quarter of the cost of replacing the Trident system.

    My view is that a Trident replacement is the wrong answer to the question of what is an appropriate defence capabilty for the future, unless the analysts are predicting a return to a Cold War stand off with an enemy, such as Russia or China, that has a similar capability to our own. I am unaware of this being the case. In which case I am slightly surprised that Gordon Brown has made such a judgement when he is keen to trim the defence budget in every other area.

    I think the general purpose of a sub based platform is that it can't be targeted, except by another sub. It gives you the possibillity of stealth mobil retaliation point for worse case scenarios. I think to limit your sea capabilities is short sighted. I agree you may not need an entire arsenal of trident platforms. But these same systems can be fitted with non nuclear warheads. But in the end it is what it is, a deterent. I see no reason why there needs to be a replacement of the entire fleet. But I definetly think there is a need for a presence in this area. There's got to be a middle ground to be found. Update and retorfit half the fleet, replace the other half for your long term recon and deterent value.

    The submarine platform does have the advantage of being stealth which was an advantage during the Cold War. The current fleet are good till 2025. The decision is really around what our future plans are. We are just commissioning a new fleet of hunter-killer submarines that are cruise capable - therefore I think that more conventional forces (such as the new aircraft carriers) would give us better value for future defence planning. Just an opinion

    Edit: So goodness only knows what Gordon thinks he is doing! I smell the odour of politics.
    Last edited by Biggles; 06-23-2006 at 05:50 PM.
    Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum


  8. The Drawing Room   -   #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Biggles
    Quote Originally Posted by calm2chaos


    I think the general purpose of a sub based platform is that it can't be targeted, except by another sub. It gives you the possibillity of stealth mobil retaliation point for worse case scenarios. I think to limit your sea capabilities is short sighted. I agree you may not need an entire arsenal of trident platforms. But these same systems can be fitted with non nuclear warheads. But in the end it is what it is, a deterent. I see no reason why there needs to be a replacement of the entire fleet. But I definetly think there is a need for a presence in this area. There's got to be a middle ground to be found. Update and retorfit half the fleet, replace the other half for your long term recon and deterent value.

    The submarine platform does have the advantage of being stealth which was an advantage during the Cold War. The current fleet are good till 2025. The decision is really around what our future plans are. We are just commissioning a new fleet of hunter-killer submarines that are cruise capable - therefore I think that more conventional forces (such as the new aircraft carriers) would give us better value for future defence planning. Just an opinion

    Edit: So goodness only knows what Gordon thinks he is doing! I smell the odour of politics.
    The quickest way to get something screwed up is to let a politician get involved.....

  9. The Drawing Room   -   #9
    Seedler's Avatar T__________________T
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    4,644
    Considering China has like hundreds of nukes, and terrorists in da Middle East supposedly have some as well, UK's better prepared than sorry..
    Biostar XE T5
    i5-750 @ 4.0 GHZ stable (CM Hyper 212)
    2 x 2GB Cosair XMS3 DDR3 1600MHZ
    Radeon 5850 @ 866/1254MHZ
    Intel X25-M in RAID 0
    WD Caviar Black 2TB in RAID 0
    3 x Asus 25.5" VW266H LCD [Eyefinity]

  10. The Drawing Room   -   #10
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oh, please...
    Posts
    15,254
    I can't make a case for giving up a sub-based nuke capability if you've already got it.

    The types of threats these platforms deter are precisely those which respond only to multinational resistance.

    The requirement to contemplate a variety of scenarios (contingent upon fluid political circumstances) is part-and-parcel of the psychology of nuclear deterrence.

    It is one more reason (as well) to eliminate terrorism/terrorists with all due speed and prejudice.

    Hopefully, this thread will go a page or three before someone says, "We wouldn't be in this briar-patch if it weren't for the United States..."
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •