Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: question on a dvd player

  1. #1
    I was looking around at some dvd players and Im looking for something to play movies on burnt DVD-rs in DIVX and XVid format..
    I stumbled across a Panasonic DVD-F87K and it looked like a good dvd player and it doesnt say that it plays divx or xvid formats tho.

    so ill talk any recamendations for a good dvd player that i described above..

    thanks ALL!

  2. Software & Hardware   -   #2
    lynx's Avatar .
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Yorkshire, England
    Posts
    9,810
    I can't tell you what good mpeg4(DivX/XviD) capable dvd players are available in the US atm, it's a couple of years since I've looked, so you should probably have a look at VideoHelp, particularly with DivX-HD becoming available.

    One thing I can almost guarantee, if any player doesn't say it plays mpeg4, then it doesn't play mpeg4. The Panasonic doesn't.

    In any case, do you really want to spend extra money on a multi-disc changer? How often would you need that?
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  3. Software & Hardware   -   #3
    harrycary's Avatar Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Omaha, Ne USA
    Posts
    1,078
    In the US try the Philips DVP642. I've had one for about a year now. I purchased it at Walmart for $69.95. (It's probably cheaper now)

    It will play a lot Xvid and Divx encoded files as well as mpegs, jpegs and Mp3s.

    As a bonus, it's also a progressive scan player.

    I found out about it at www.videohelp.com.

    The site lists user-submitted posts about different players and file compatibilities.

    regards

  4. Software & Hardware   -   #4
    thanks guys! ill check out that site and I actually used to own a philips DVP642 but it died after a year and I wasn't sure if I wanted to buy another 1.

  5. Software & Hardware   -   #5
    muchspl3's Avatar muchspl3 > muchspl2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Location Location
    Posts
    1,824
    get a phillips, and you can fix your old one for like a buck, its was a bad part inside them, cost less that a buck to replace
    `anyone from Argentina on this board?

    I need your help and if you can help me pM me

  6. Software & Hardware   -   #6
    suprafreak6's Avatar Suprafreak6 is Back!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    -=U.S.A=-
    Posts
    2,450
    ive had great expieriences with cheap brand dvd players...all of them have worked for more than 2 years and are only like 30$
    plays all my burnt movies and everything i play on there..its great!

  7. Software & Hardware   -   #7
    Virtualbody1234's Avatar Forum Star BT Rep: +2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    11,497
    Quote Originally Posted by muchspl3
    get a phillips, and you can fix your old one for like a buck, its was a bad part inside them, cost less that a buck to replace
    Specificly which part?

  8. Software & Hardware   -   #8
    muchspl3's Avatar muchspl3 > muchspl2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Location Location
    Posts
    1,824
    Common DVP 642 problem (only problem with a great player): They die, and you have a blinking red power
    button.
    This is actually surprisingly easy to fix. It's really easier than I make it look, but I'm just being really clear in
    case anyone reading this has never seen a soldering iron before. Here are the steps I did (and note that, if
    you're still under warranty, this will void your warranty). The decision to try this is up to your own discretion
    and may be a last ditch effort before throwing the player away.
    Short version: Check the board to see if capacitor C316 is bulging. If so, get a 1000u capacitor >=16V and
    replace it.
    Long version:
    1. Unplug everything
    2. Unscrew the side and rear screws to remove the top cover.
    3. On the board where the power cable goes in, look for a capacitor (looks like a little drum with a '+' on the
    top) that is bulging upward either a little or a lot. It may be leaking some brown fluid as well.
    4. I'm betting that the writing on the board at this location says 'C316'. If you google 'dvp642' and 'c316',
    you'll get hundreds of hits...
    5. If that's the case, you'll need to find a capacitor and a soldering iron. Visit radio shack or similar electronics
    place and buy an elecrolytic capacitor that says 1000u (the 'u' is actually a lower case greek 'mu') with a
    voltage greater than or equal to 16v (this is not calculated: it's simply what others have reported success with.
    I couldn't find one and used a 35V one instead). You should be able to find one that looks somewhat similar to
    the damaged one (it might be a little bigger or smaller, but you'll want the same basic shape). This should cost
    less than $2.
    6. Borrow or buy a cheap soldering iron and some solder. I borrowed one from a friend at work...this is NOT
    my area of expertise, so don't worry about the difficulty!
    7. Now the tricky part: back on your DVD player, you need to get that board out. Unplug the two cables
    connecting to the board we're working on, unscrew the screws holding it down, and, using some pliers, hold
    down the wings of the little plastic piece that is still holding the board down and slide the board up. I flipped
    this around to get at the bottom while leaving the power cord in place.
    8. Heat up the soldering iron. Locate the spot on the bottom of the board where the C316 capacitor is attached.
    Remove your new capacitor from the package. There should be one shorter leg which is the negative side. It
    will likely be marked this way as well.
    9. One side of the capacitor should have a ' -' on it. Note which side this is. You may not be able to see it until it
    is removed, so be aware of needing to know this as you remove it.
    10. After it is warm enough to melt solder, lay the soldering iron across the joints you identified as belonging to
    C316. Tug gently on C316 as you do this and it should soon come free. This is a little tricky to hold the iron,
    the board, and the capacitor all at once, so please don't burn yourself! Again, note which side is negative and
    which hole it came from. This is the negative hole, and the other is positive. There will likely be some solder
    left over around each hole. Just try not to let it run between the two holes or you will short out the connection.
    11. Grab your new capacitor and line up the longer leg with the positive hole. Lay the soldering iron against
    that hole on the other side and push the leg through. Line up the negative leg/hole and repeat. Lay the iron
    across both to heat up enough to push the capacitor legs through and the capacitor down to the board.
    12. Check the connections for each leg. There should be a small mound of solder joining each leg to the metal
    of the board, but not running to any other point of the board. If it's run to some other points, you'll need to do
    some searching to see how to clean up it up a little bit as I'm not an expert at this. If you need a little more
    solder, lay the iron across the joint for a few seconds, then feed your solder into the hot spot until a small
    amount flows over the joint. Remove the iron, wait a moment, then remove the solder. Look at the other
    solder joints on the board for a rough idea of how it should look.
    13. Use some wire cutters to trim the legs down to the solder.
    14. Pop the board back over the plastic piece and reconnect the cables.
    15. At this point, you're on your own. Personally, I made sure I wasn't touching any metal and plugged it in.
    Since I didn't blow any fuses and the player seemed to work, I unplugged it, reassembled it, and went to watch
    a movie.
    `anyone from Argentina on this board?

    I need your help and if you can help me pM me

  9. Software & Hardware   -   #9
    lynx's Avatar .
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Yorkshire, England
    Posts
    9,810
    It's amazing just how many built-in power supplies of that period failed because of poor quality caps of about that size. Probably all from the same manufacturer.
    Quote Originally Posted by muchspl3
    10. After it is warm enough to melt solder, lay the soldering iron across the joints you identified as belonging to C316. Tug gently on C316 as you do this and it should soon come free.
    A little (de)soldering tip on that one. You may find it hard to melt the solder, simply because there isn't enough surface area on which to apply the soldering iron. To get round this problem, adding a little solder will increase the surface area and consequently melt the existing solder.
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  10. Software & Hardware   -   #10
    Virtualbody1234's Avatar Forum Star BT Rep: +2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    11,497
    Quote Originally Posted by lynx
    It's amazing just how many built-in power supplies of that period failed because of poor quality caps of about that size. Probably all from the same manufacturer.
    Quote Originally Posted by muchspl3
    10. After it is warm enough to melt solder, lay the soldering iron across the joints you identified as belonging to C316. Tug gently on C316 as you do this and it should soon come free.
    A little (de)soldering tip on that one. You may find it hard to melt the solder, simply because there isn't enough surface area on which to apply the soldering iron. To get round this problem, adding a little solder will increase the surface area and consequently melt the existing solder.
    Using a desoldering wick or suction pump can be helpful too.




Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •