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Thread: How Many Of You Read

  1. #1
    MagicNakor's Avatar On the Peripheral
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    And if you have, do you think the reasons it was banned were valid? Is the depiction of society in it an accurate one?

    I haven't read it in years, unfortuantely, I'll have to dig out my copy before I can fully participate in any following conversation.

    things are quiet until hitler decides he'd like to invade russia
    so, he does
    the russians are like "OMG WTF D00DZ, STOP TKING"
    and the germans are still like "omg ph34r n00bz"
    the russians fall back, all the way to moscow
    and then they all begin h4xing, which brings on the russian winter
    the germans are like "wtf, h4x"
    -- WW2 for the l33t

  2. Lounge   -   #2
    Skweeky's Avatar Manker's web totty
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    well, as some of you might know, I've written a paper about that book this year.

    And what exactly do you think the reason for the banning is?

    There are two mainreasons given:
    1. The 'abusive' language used in the book and the influence on society of that.
    2. The negative criticism on the American society.

    I don't think these reasons were valid reasons to ban this book. The point is that Salinger tried to describe the world of a teenager with a lot of personal problems, who tries it find its place in the world. People often say that the language used it 'crap'. Holden used words like 'asshole', 'bastard', 'kill', at random, yes, that is true. BUT, you cannot forget the context in which these words are used. There are only a few cases in the book where he really means it as an insult. Many people hold on to the fact that the word 'fuck' is used 4 times in the story. They never mention that it is never used by the maincharacter itself. In the story one can find the sentence 'Somebody had written fuck you on the wall'. Holden was apalled by that and tried to paint over the words because he couldn't stand the idea of his little sister seeing these kind of 'obscenitities'. According to me, it's just the language of a teenager trying to act cool and tough in a world he doesn't entirely understand.
    Is that a reason to ban a book? NO

    Is the depiction of the society of that book a good one? YES
    The book criticizes some points of the American society (phony behaviour, alcholol abuse, violence), but none of them are made up, it is all quite realistic.
    Ofcourse, it is a story. One may not forget that it is fiction after all.

    Another third (less important) reason that is given to censor this book, is that fact that is ' a book of psychopats'. The killer of John Lennon used it as a guide through NY....Again, is that a reason to censor it? NO, ofcourse not. As RF mentioned to me a few days ago when we were discussing this matter: 'How many psychopats have read LOTR of The Discworld Novels?'

    Censorship is not a rational thing. When considering the matter of censorship RATIONALLY, one must admit that obtaining knowledge, of what kind so ever, can't be negative and that it can only help society in advancing.


    Conclusion: yes, the catcher is a good book, yes it's pretty realistic but it's still a story. It shouldn't be censored . If you want to read it, you should be able to do that without any problems. If u don't like it, don't read it then. It's not like a simple book is going to corrupt the mind of a teenager.

    PS: In the list of 'most banned books in the '90 in the USA', The Catcher is still with the first 10.....weird huh, in a country that controls its media with a 'free-press model'.

    peace

  3. Lounge   -   #3
    MagicNakor's Avatar On the Peripheral
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    Is "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" still on the top of that list?

    things are quiet until hitler decides he'd like to invade russia
    so, he does
    the russians are like "OMG WTF D00DZ, STOP TKING"
    and the germans are still like "omg ph34r n00bz"
    the russians fall back, all the way to moscow
    and then they all begin h4xing, which brings on the russian winter
    the germans are like "wtf, h4x"
    -- WW2 for the l33t

  4. Lounge   -   #4
    Where can I find a copy of that banned books list??? And not the list of books that have been challenged in court for some public/school library shit. Sounds very intriguing!! Does anyone know what other books are on it/how long a list is it???

    Coincidently I was having a conversation at work about Catcher in the Rye last night. It has spurred me to read it again. Hopefully soon but I have a pile of books 2 feet high to get through first!!
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  5. Lounge   -   #5
    MagicNakor's Avatar On the Peripheral
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    The Top 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000

    1. Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz
    2. Daddyís Roommate by Michael Willhoite
    3. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
    4. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
    5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    6. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    7. Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    8. Forever by Judy Blume
    9. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
    10. Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
    11. Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman
    12. My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier
    13. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    14. The Giver by Lois Lowry
    15. Itís Perfectly Normal by Robie Harris
    16. Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine
    17. A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck
    18. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
    19. Sex by Madonna
    20. Earthís Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel
    21. The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    22. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine LíEngle
    23. Go Ask Alice by Anonymous
    24. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
    25. In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
    26. The Stupids (Series) by Harry Allard
    27. The Witches by Roald Dahl
    28. The New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein
    29. Anastasia Krupnik (Series) by Lois Lowry
    30. The Goats by Brock Cole
    31. Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane
    32. Blubber by Judy Blume
    33. Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan
    34. Halloween ABC by Eve Merriam
    35. We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier
    36. Final Exit by Derek Humphry
    37. The Handmaidís Tale by Margaret Atwood
    38. Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George
    39. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
    40. Whatís Happening to my Body? Book for Girls: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Daughters by Lynda Madaras
    41. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    42. Beloved by Toni Morrison
    43. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
    44. The Pigman by Paul Zindel
    45. Bumps in the Night by Harry Allard
    46. Deenie by Judy Blume
    47. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
    48. Annie on my Mind by Nancy Garden
    49. The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar
    50. Cross Your Fingers, Spit in Your Hat by Alvin Schwartz
    51. A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
    52. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    53. Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice)
    54. Asking About Sex and Growing Up by Joanna Cole
    55. Cujo by Stephen King
    56. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
    57. The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    58. Boys and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy
    59. Ordinary People by Judith Guest
    60. American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
    61. Whatís Happening to my Body? Book for Boys: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Sons by Lynda Madaras
    62. Are You There, God? Itís Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
    63. Crazy Lady by Jane Conly
    64. Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher
    65. Fade by Robert Cormier
    66. Guess What? by Mem Fox
    67. The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
    68. The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline Cooney
    69. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    70. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
    71. Native Son by Richard Wright
    72. Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Womenís Fantasies by Nancy Friday
    73. Curses, Hexes and Spells by Daniel Cohen
    74. Jack by A.M. Homes
    75. Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya
    76. Where Did I Come From? by Peter Mayle
    77. Carrie by Stephen King
    78. Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume
    79. On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer
    80. Arizona Kid by Ron Koertge
    81. Family Secrets by Norma Klein
    82. Mommy Laid An Egg by Babette Cole
    83. The Dead Zone by Stephen King
    84. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
    85. Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
    86. Always Running by Luis Rodriguez
    87. Private Parts by Howard Stern
    88. Whereís Waldo? by Martin Hanford
    89. Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene
    90. Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman
    91. Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
    92. Running Loose by Chris Crutcher
    93. Sex Education by Jenny Davis
    94. The Drowning of Stephen Jones by Bette Greene
    95. Girls and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy
    96. How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell
    97. View from the Cherry Tree by Willo Davis Roberts
    98. The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
    99. The Terrorist by Caroline Cooney
    100. Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

    Source

    things are quiet until hitler decides he'd like to invade russia
    so, he does
    the russians are like "OMG WTF D00DZ, STOP TKING"
    and the germans are still like "omg ph34r n00bz"
    the russians fall back, all the way to moscow
    and then they all begin h4xing, which brings on the russian winter
    the germans are like "wtf, h4x"
    -- WW2 for the l33t

  6. Lounge   -   #6
    killallhippies's Avatar Poster
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    Does anyone know if there are any banned books in the u.k? Every single Mills and Boon book ever written should be banned.

  7. Lounge   -   #7
    Originally posted by MagicNakor@9 May 2003 - 12:14
    The Top 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000

    1. Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz
    2. Daddyís Roommate by Michael Willhoite
    3. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
    4. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
    5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    6. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    7. Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    8. Forever by Judy Blume
    9. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
    10. Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
    11. Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman
    12. My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier
    13. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    14. The Giver by Lois Lowry
    15. Itís Perfectly Normal by Robie Harris
    16. Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine
    17. A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck
    18. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
    19. Sex by Madonna
    20. Earthís Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel
    21. The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    22. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine LíEngle
    23. Go Ask Alice by Anonymous
    24. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
    25. In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
    26. The Stupids (Series) by Harry Allard
    27. The Witches by Roald Dahl
    28. The New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein
    29. Anastasia Krupnik (Series) by Lois Lowry
    30. The Goats by Brock Cole
    31. Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane
    32. Blubber by Judy Blume
    33. Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan
    34. Halloween ABC by Eve Merriam
    35. We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier
    36. Final Exit by Derek Humphry
    37. The Handmaidís Tale by Margaret Atwood
    38. Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George
    39. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
    40. Whatís Happening to my Body? Book for Girls: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Daughters by Lynda Madaras
    41. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    42. Beloved by Toni Morrison
    43. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
    44. The Pigman by Paul Zindel
    45. Bumps in the Night by Harry Allard
    46. Deenie by Judy Blume
    47. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
    48. Annie on my Mind by Nancy Garden
    49. The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar
    50. Cross Your Fingers, Spit in Your Hat by Alvin Schwartz
    51. A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
    52. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    53. Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice)
    54. Asking About Sex and Growing Up by Joanna Cole
    55. Cujo by Stephen King
    56. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
    57. The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    58. Boys and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy
    59. Ordinary People by Judith Guest
    60. American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
    61. Whatís Happening to my Body? Book for Boys: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Sons by Lynda Madaras
    62. Are You There, God? Itís Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
    63. Crazy Lady by Jane Conly
    64. Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher
    65. Fade by Robert Cormier
    66. Guess What? by Mem Fox
    67. The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
    68. The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline Cooney
    69. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    70. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
    71. Native Son by Richard Wright
    72. Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Womenís Fantasies by Nancy Friday
    73. Curses, Hexes and Spells by Daniel Cohen
    74. Jack by A.M. Homes
    75. Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya
    76. Where Did I Come From? by Peter Mayle
    77. Carrie by Stephen King
    78. Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume
    79. On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer
    80. Arizona Kid by Ron Koertge
    81. Family Secrets by Norma Klein
    82. Mommy Laid An Egg by Babette Cole
    83. The Dead Zone by Stephen King
    84. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
    85. Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
    86. Always Running by Luis Rodriguez
    87. Private Parts by Howard Stern
    88. Whereís Waldo? by Martin Hanford
    89. Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene
    90. Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman
    91. Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
    92. Running Loose by Chris Crutcher
    93. Sex Education by Jenny Davis
    94. The Drowning of Stephen Jones by Bette Greene
    95. Girls and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy
    96. How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell
    97. View from the Cherry Tree by Willo Davis Roberts
    98. The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
    99. The Terrorist by Caroline Cooney
    100. Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

    Source


    Thanks for posting that list MagicNakor. It's from the American Library Association and I'm sure I said "NOT" the list of challenged books. I can't see "The Turner Diaries" or anything like that. Where's the books by David Irving?? When I said "Banned" books I didn't mean ones that mentioned witchcraft, race, sexuality, etc. Sorry if I didn't make myself clear. Interestingly I was reading the ALA site this morning and I'm sure I recall that a school in the US (where else??) has banned Fahrenheit 451!!! What a distinct lack of irony. That's what you get for living in a Fundamentalist country I suppose. "Book burners" banning a book about book burning and intellectual freedom - priceless!!!
    Signature removed

  8. Lounge   -   #8
    MagicNakor's Avatar On the Peripheral
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    They usually lump banned and challenged books together. Furthermore, there is more than one list compiled of banned books.

    But here are some more.

    Ulysses by James Joyce
    Candide by Voltaire
    Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure) by John Cleland
    Lysistrata by Aristophanes
    The Canterbury Tales by Chaucer
    The Decameron by Boccaccio
    Moll Flanders by Defoe
    various editions of The Arabian Nights
    Family Limitation by Margaret Sanger
    Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
    Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
    The Rights of Man and The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine
    The Provincial Letters by Blaise Pascal
    Jerusalem Delivered by Tasso
    Call of the Wild by Jack London
    Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
    Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
    State and Revolution by Lenin
    Can Such Things Be? by Ambrose Bierce
    Civil Disobedience by Thoreau
    The Bible and The Quran
    Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence
    E for Ecstasy
    Did Six Million Really Die? by Ernst ZŁndl
    Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Twelfth Night, and the Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
    Origin of Species by Charles Darwin
    Little Red Riding Hood
    Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Stowe
    Silas Marner by George Eliot
    Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
    Essay Concerning Human Understanding by John Locke
    The Story of Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman

    And the top 10 banned books

    1. Ulysses by James Joyce
    2. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    3. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
    4. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
    5. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
    6. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    7. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    8. Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence
    9. Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe
    10. Candide by Voltaire

    things are quiet until hitler decides he'd like to invade russia
    so, he does
    the russians are like "OMG WTF D00DZ, STOP TKING"
    and the germans are still like "omg ph34r n00bz"
    the russians fall back, all the way to moscow
    and then they all begin h4xing, which brings on the russian winter
    the germans are like "wtf, h4x"
    -- WW2 for the l33t

  9. Lounge   -   #9
    there are no banned books in the USA there is no law preventing u from printing any book there are a few laws to limit the sale of certin books to adults

    there are a few orgs that are trying to get books baned but all they can do is keep them out of there school or public libary they can not stop the sale and distribution of them though

    certin types of porn are not allowed but there not books anyway, there porn.
    and even there its only due to age limitations of the models and the peps who can buy them


    and LOL baning fairy tales and darwin
    its unbeleveable what a christen will do to protec there faith
    guess they dont like fairy tails cus there too much like there bible tails

    hummmmmmm...
    fairy tails
    bible tails
    is this a coinsidence? woud u notice the diffrence if they where reversed?

  10. Lounge   -   #10
    Skweeky's Avatar Manker's web totty
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    Originally posted by QuietSilence!@10 May 2003 - 11:01
    there are no banned books in the USA there is no law preventing u from printing any book there are a few laws to limit the sale of certin books to adults

    no, there is no federal law about that, but I believe states or even cities are free to ban books from libraries or schools if they want that.


    btw: It's a disgrace that they banned 'Candide'....it's one of the most beautiful stories I've ever read!

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