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Thread: strange Power Suplly fan noise.

  1. #1
    worldpease's Avatar always annoying
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    It has been long since I made this kind of question,
    but here I go again.

    Today, when I started my PC, I imediatly noticed that it was making a very loud noise,
    or at least lot louder thatn before,
    and after a quick scan, it turned out to be the power supply Fan.
    But the thing is that the fan makes this vibrating loud noise in cycles,
    one minute everything seems fine, and the next minute its making acting wierd
    and also, the power supply area gets a little bit warm.

    And after 20 minutes or so have gone by,
    everything seems get back to normal.

    Do you think it could be due to tha weater getting cold?

    In any case,
    I don't mind getting the new power supply, as I don't think it will be that
    expensive... what really bothers me is havin' to back up all my ''stuff'',
    damn thats a lot of work.

  2. Software & Hardware   -   #2
    famous45's Avatar money=happiness BT Rep: +1
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    My power supply sounds like 747 taking off but it a cheap piece of crap. Yours sounds like the bushing or bearings are wearing out like by brothers did. Probably should get a new one.

    And why would you have to back up all your stuff for just a power supply? You not formating the hdd or anything like that.

  3. Software & Hardware   -   #3
    Virtualbody1234's Avatar Forum Star BT Rep: +2
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    Why would you replace the power supply?

    Fans are replaceable.

  4. Software & Hardware   -   #4
    ExilE^'s Avatar Metalhead
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    I found the old PSU I had got loud at times, had a look at it was due to being a cheap make and not solid which was causing lots of vibrations. However this may not be the case for you check your fans also as said above

  5. Software & Hardware   -   #5
    Poster BT Rep: +4
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    replace the fan in the psu if you can, or get a new psu before the old one overheats and goes down and takes along with it some other components

  6. Software & Hardware   -   #6
    mildthrill's Avatar kermit the thief
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    I just think it needs to be said that the capacitors in power supplies hold enough energy (even when unplugged) to kill someone!!! That's not to say you can't change the fan, just use EXTREME CAUTION and if you're even a little uneasy about it, buy a new power supply.

    And you don't need to back up everything, it's a quick swap-out (though it's a good idea to back-up, just because shit happens).

  7. Software & Hardware   -   #7
    Virtualbody1234's Avatar Forum Star BT Rep: +2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mildthrill View Post
    I just think it needs to be said that the capacitors in power supplies hold enough energy (even when unplugged) to kill someone!!! That's not to say you can't change the fan, just use EXTREME CAUTION and if you're even a little uneasy about it, buy a new power supply.

    And you don't need to back up everything, it's a quick swap-out (though it's a good idea to back-up, just because shit happens).


    Capacitors in a power supply are there to smooth out the power fluctuations of the output. They are low voltage. They can also be discharged easily. It's not going to kill anyone.

  8. Software & Hardware   -   #8
    mildthrill's Avatar kermit the thief
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    I admit, my electrical knowledge isn't totally up to snuff. I do know that 12v won't kill you, but .5 amp easily can. How does that relate to power supplies, capacitors and human life? I'm not sure... but I do know that any reputable website that deals with cracking open a PS for modding and whatnot starts with a disclaimer that at least includes potential for personal injury (sometimes they mention death) and possible damage to the computer.

    Maybe Virtual is 100% right. I'm just echoing what I've heard. I've personally changed a few power supply fans and have had no problem because there's no need to go near the 'dangerous' stuff (though it is exposed). But I would still maintain some awareness of what's in there.

  9. Software & Hardware   -   #9
    lynx's Avatar .
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    Quote Originally Posted by Virtualbody1234 View Post
    Capacitors in a power supply are there to smooth out the power fluctuations of the output. They are low voltage. They can also be discharged easily. It's not going to kill anyone.
    Not entirely true.

    All switch-mode PSUs have one or two caps which can run at up to 150% of line voltage and can also give a very high current, it is an inherent part of the design principle.

    A well designed PSU should discharge these caps to a safe level quicker that anyone can get the cover off. That requires an extra discharge resistor and that costs money, so while they may be included in the original design they are often omitted in practice.

    They are easy to spot though, look for the big ones that are rated at 200 or 400V. Discharge them with an insulated screwdriver across the connections on the base of the circuit board if you are likely to get anywhere near them.

    They aren't likely to kill you unless you get a discharge across your chest and you've got a bad heart, but you can certainly get burnt fingers. And it hurts!
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

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