Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33

Thread: britain worst place for children

  1. #1
    This came out last week, but its so quiet in here...
    Children growing up in the United Kingdom suffer greater deprivation, worse relationships with their parents and are exposed to more risks from alcohol, drugs and unsafe sex than those in any other wealthy country in the world, according to a study from the United Nations.

    The UK is bottom of the league of 21 economically advanced countries according to a "report card"' put together by Unicef on the wellbeing of children and adolescents, trailing the United States which comes second to last.


    Today's findings will be a blow to the government, which has set great store by lifting children out of poverty and improving their education and prospects. Al Aynsley Green, the children's commissioner for England, acknowledges that the UN has accurately highlighted the troubled lives of children. "There is a crisis at the heart of our society and we must not continue to ignore the impact of our attitudes towards children and young people and the effect that this has on their wellbeing," he says in a response today.

    "I hope this report will prompt us all to look beyond the statistics and to the underlying causes of our failure to nurture happy and healthy children in the UK. These children represent the future of our country and from the findings of this report they are in poor health, unable to maintain loving and successful relationships, feel unsafe and insecure, have low aspirations and put themselves at risk.

    "It is time to stop demonising children and young people for what goes wrong and start supporting them to make positive choices. To bring an end to the confusing messages we give to young people about their role, responsibility and position in society and ensure that every child feels valued and has their rights respected."

    The Unicef team assessed the treatment of children in six different areas - material wellbeing; health and safety; educational wellbeing, family and peer relationships, behaviours and risks; and the young people's own perceptions of their wellbeing.

    The Netherlands tops the league, followed by Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Spain. The bottom five are Portugal, Austria, Hungary, the US and the UK.

    Nine countries, all of them in northern Europe, have brought child poverty down below 10%, the report shows. But it remains at 15% in the three southern European countries - Portugal, Spain and Italy - and in the UK, Ireland and the US. Child poverty is a relative measure that shows how far their standard of living has fallen below the national average.

    The Unicef report adds: "The evidence from many countries persistently shows that children who grow up in poverty are more vulnerable: specifically, they are more likely to be in poor health, to have learning and behavioural difficulties, to underachieve at school, to become pregnant at too early an age, to have lower skills and aspirations, to be low paid, unemployed and welfare-dependent."

    The Conservatives seized on the report, claiming that it endorsed their attack on the way in which Gordon Brown had addressed the issue of child poverty, and the prime minister had demonised the role of children in his drive against antisocial behaviour.

    The shadow chancellor, George Osborne, said: "This report tells the truth about Brown's Britain. After 10 years of his welfare and education policies, our children today have the lowest wellbeing in the developed world."

    Labour said it had taken 700,000 people out of child poverty and was mounting an unprecedented investment programme in a network of children's centres. A government spokesman argued that in many cases the data use d in the report was several years old and "does not reflect more recent improvements in the UK such as the continuing fall in the teenage pregnancy rate or in the proportion of children living in workless households".

    Some of the most shocking findings concern the relationships children and adolescents have with their family and peers. The UK is bottom of the 21 countries.

    This, says Unicef, "is as difficult to measure as it is critical to wellbeing".

    To attempt to score countries, the experts have focused on children's own reports of how much time their parents spend "just talking" to them, how many say they eat the main meal of the day with their parents more than once a week and the percentages of 11, 13 and 15-year-olds who find their peers "kind and helpful". UK parents do reasonably well on "talking regularly" - 60% of children say they chat, putting Britain 12th in the league table. But while a similar proportion say they eat together more than once a week, the UK lags towards the bottom of the league, with Italy, Iceland and France at the very top end.

    The report presents a sad picture of relationships with friends, which are so important to children. Not much more than 40% of the UK's 11, 13 and 15-year-olds find their peers "kind and helpful", which is the worst score of all the developed countries.

    The UK takes bottom place "by a considerable distance" for the number of young people who smoke, abuse drink and drugs, engage in risky sex and become pregnant at too early an age. For 16 out of 17 OECD countries with the data, between 15% and 28% of young people have had sex by the age of 15. For the UK, the figure is 40%.

    On education, the UK comes 17th out of 21. At the age of 15, British children score relatively well on reading, mathematical and scientific literacy. But more than 30% of 15- to 19-year-olds are not in education or training and are not looking beyond low-skilled work.

    CHILD WELL-BEING TABLE
    1. Netherlands
    2. Sweden
    3. Denmark
    4. Finland
    5. Spain
    6. Switzerland
    7. Norway
    8. Italy
    9. Republic of Ireland
    10. Belgium
    11. Germany
    12. Canada
    13. Greece
    14. Poland
    15. Czech Republic
    16. France
    17. Portugal
    18. Austria
    19. Hungary
    20. United States
    21. United Kingdom
    Nothing particularly surprising in the individual stats for me, but it is depressing that we're last. Why do scandinavian countries + switzerland always seem to win these things? What is so different about their laws/culture that makes them 'technically' nicer places to live?
    Personally I want to experiment with a scandinavian model: i.e. high taxes, high welfare support, bugger all standing military, low geopolitical power, lower population if possible. It would no doubt come at the expense of some economic growth (might be wrong but i don't think scandinavian countries perform very well in this area), but do you care if it does work and makes the country a nicer place to live?

  2. The Drawing Room   -   #2
    bigboab's Avatar Poster BT Rep: +1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    30,399
    Quote Originally Posted by ilw View Post
    This came out last week, but its so quiet in here...
    Children growing up in the United Kingdom suffer greater deprivation, worse relationships with their parents and are exposed to more risks from alcohol, drugs and unsafe sex than those in any other wealthy country in the world, according to a study from the United Nations.

    The UK is bottom of the league of 21 economically advanced countries according to a "report card"' put together by Unicef on the wellbeing of children and adolescents, trailing the United States which comes second to last.


    Today's findings will be a blow to the government, which has set great store by lifting children out of poverty and improving their education and prospects. Al Aynsley Green, the children's commissioner for England, acknowledges that the UN has accurately highlighted the troubled lives of children. "There is a crisis at the heart of our society and we must not continue to ignore the impact of our attitudes towards children and young people and the effect that this has on their wellbeing," he says in a response today.

    "I hope this report will prompt us all to look beyond the statistics and to the underlying causes of our failure to nurture happy and healthy children in the UK. These children represent the future of our country and from the findings of this report they are in poor health, unable to maintain loving and successful relationships, feel unsafe and insecure, have low aspirations and put themselves at risk.

    "It is time to stop demonising children and young people for what goes wrong and start supporting them to make positive choices. To bring an end to the confusing messages we give to young people about their role, responsibility and position in society and ensure that every child feels valued and has their rights respected."

    The Unicef team assessed the treatment of children in six different areas - material wellbeing; health and safety; educational wellbeing, family and peer relationships, behaviours and risks; and the young people's own perceptions of their wellbeing.

    The Netherlands tops the league, followed by Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Spain. The bottom five are Portugal, Austria, Hungary, the US and the UK.

    Nine countries, all of them in northern Europe, have brought child poverty down below 10%, the report shows. But it remains at 15% in the three southern European countries - Portugal, Spain and Italy - and in the UK, Ireland and the US. Child poverty is a relative measure that shows how far their standard of living has fallen below the national average.

    The Unicef report adds: "The evidence from many countries persistently shows that children who grow up in poverty are more vulnerable: specifically, they are more likely to be in poor health, to have learning and behavioural difficulties, to underachieve at school, to become pregnant at too early an age, to have lower skills and aspirations, to be low paid, unemployed and welfare-dependent."

    The Conservatives seized on the report, claiming that it endorsed their attack on the way in which Gordon Brown had addressed the issue of child poverty, and the prime minister had demonised the role of children in his drive against antisocial behaviour.

    The shadow chancellor, George Osborne, said: "This report tells the truth about Brown's Britain. After 10 years of his welfare and education policies, our children today have the lowest wellbeing in the developed world."

    Labour said it had taken 700,000 people out of child poverty and was mounting an unprecedented investment programme in a network of children's centres. A government spokesman argued that in many cases the data use d in the report was several years old and "does not reflect more recent improvements in the UK such as the continuing fall in the teenage pregnancy rate or in the proportion of children living in workless households".

    Some of the most shocking findings concern the relationships children and adolescents have with their family and peers. The UK is bottom of the 21 countries.

    This, says Unicef, "is as difficult to measure as it is critical to wellbeing".

    To attempt to score countries, the experts have focused on children's own reports of how much time their parents spend "just talking" to them, how many say they eat the main meal of the day with their parents more than once a week and the percentages of 11, 13 and 15-year-olds who find their peers "kind and helpful". UK parents do reasonably well on "talking regularly" - 60% of children say they chat, putting Britain 12th in the league table. But while a similar proportion say they eat together more than once a week, the UK lags towards the bottom of the league, with Italy, Iceland and France at the very top end.

    The report presents a sad picture of relationships with friends, which are so important to children. Not much more than 40% of the UK's 11, 13 and 15-year-olds find their peers "kind and helpful", which is the worst score of all the developed countries.

    The UK takes bottom place "by a considerable distance" for the number of young people who smoke, abuse drink and drugs, engage in risky sex and become pregnant at too early an age. For 16 out of 17 OECD countries with the data, between 15% and 28% of young people have had sex by the age of 15. For the UK, the figure is 40%.

    On education, the UK comes 17th out of 21. At the age of 15, British children score relatively well on reading, mathematical and scientific literacy. But more than 30% of 15- to 19-year-olds are not in education or training and are not looking beyond low-skilled work.

    CHILD WELL-BEING TABLE
    1. Netherlands
    2. Sweden
    3. Denmark
    4. Finland
    5. Spain
    6. Switzerland
    7. Norway
    8. Italy
    9. Republic of Ireland
    10. Belgium
    11. Germany
    12. Canada
    13. Greece
    14. Poland
    15. Czech Republic
    16. France
    17. Portugal
    18. Austria
    19. Hungary
    20. United States
    21. United Kingdom
    Nothing particularly surprising in the individual stats for me, but it is depressing that we're last. Why do scandinavian countries + switzerland always seem to win these things? What is so different about their laws/culture that makes them 'technically' nicer places to live?

    Personally I want to experiment with a scandinavian model: i.e. high taxes, high welfare support, bugger all standing military, low geopolitical power, lower population if possible. It would no doubt come at the expense of some economic growth (might be wrong but i don't think scandinavian countries perform very well in this area), but do you care if it does work and makes the country a nicer place to live?
    Wouldn't we all.

    I agree with you entirely. One of the biggest faults in the UK is that adults will not listen to children.
    The best way to keep a secret:- Tell everyone not to tell anyone.

  3. The Drawing Room   -   #3
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oh, please...
    Posts
    15,254
    Sounds like horseshit to me.

    Where did this come from, Ian?
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

  4. The Drawing Room   -   #4
    bigboab's Avatar Poster BT Rep: +1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    30,399
    Quote Originally Posted by j2k4 View Post
    Sounds like horseshit to me.

    Where did this come from, Ian?
    It must be true. It was in the papers.
    The best way to keep a secret:- Tell everyone not to tell anyone.

  5. The Drawing Room   -   #5
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oh, please...
    Posts
    15,254
    Quote Originally Posted by bigboab View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by j2k4 View Post
    Sounds like horseshit to me.

    Where did this come from, Ian?
    It must be true. It was in the papers.
    Well, I don't care - my competitive juices have been stirred - there cannot be anything at all (at all) in the U.K. that is worse than it is here, and everyone knows it.

    We'll sue for last place, if we can find a venue willing to entertain our complaint.
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

  6. The Drawing Room   -   #6
    Mr JP Fugley's Avatar Frog Shoulder BT Rep: +4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    9,747
    I believe it's from a UNICEF report.
    "there is nothing misogynistic about anything, stop trippin.
    i type this way because im black and from nyc chill son "

  7. The Drawing Room   -   #7
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oh, please...
    Posts
    15,254
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr JP Fugley View Post
    I believe it's from a UNICEF report.

    Well, there you go.

    Qiute possibly the most blatantly pro-child organization extant.

    Incredibly biased.
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

  8. The Drawing Room   -   #8
    Quote Originally Posted by j2k4 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bigboab View Post

    It must be true. It was in the papers.
    Well, I don't care - my competitive juices have been stirred - there cannot be anything at all (at all) in the U.K. that is worse than it is here, and everyone knows it.

    We'll sue for last place, if we can find a venue willing to entertain our complaint.
    i think you'll find that we kick your arse in drugs, underage drinking and underage sex. though being an open minded person, i think its wrong to assume these are bad things, and if britain really is the worst place to grow up maybe they're the only things keeping the kids from topping themselves

    article is from the guardian, underlying report is from UNICEF
    Last edited by ilw; 02-18-2007 at 04:10 PM.

  9. The Drawing Room   -   #9
    lynx's Avatar .
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Yorkshire, England
    Posts
    9,810
    Part of the problem with this report is that it is almost entirely statistics based, with little regard for common sense.

    For example, if you had a country with 5 families, one earning 10 million (pounds, dollars, euros, it doesn't matter) per year and the other 4 earning only 1 million per year then UNICEF statistics would tell you that 80 percent of the population was living in property. While it would be pretty easy to spot in a country of only 5 families, it isn't quite so obvious when you look at real countries.

    In addition, many of the so called "failings" are in areas of the child's own "perceived" wellbeing, but that doesn't tell you whether their wellbeing is felt to be lower because they have higher expectations. I saw some extracts of the way some of the kids were interviewed, and many of the observations the kids came up with had little or no basis on fact.

    The report places most emphasis on the areas which are most difficult to measure, not even a remotely sensible position on which to base a judgement.
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  10. The Drawing Room   -   #10
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oh, please...
    Posts
    15,254
    Quote Originally Posted by ilw View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by j2k4 View Post

    Well, I don't care - my competitive juices have been stirred - there cannot be anything at all (at all) in the U.K. that is worse than it is here, and everyone knows it.

    We'll sue for last place, if we can find a venue willing to entertain our complaint.
    i think you'll find that we kick your arse in drugs, underage drinking and underage sex. though being an open minded person, i think its wrong to assume these are bad things, and if britain really is the worst place to grow up maybe they're the only things keeping the kids from topping themselves

    article is from the guardian, underlying report is from UNICEF
    While 'tis a true enigma that any society can out-do us in the area of youth-neglect, I am sure you are a victim of bias.

    You should be very proud.
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •