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Thread: Convert PC FAN to

  1. #1
    suprafreak6's Avatar Suprafreak6 is Back!
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    Is there a way to convert a PC fan to use the ac plugs for US...anyone think of anything? My friend has a surround set reciever that creates alot of heat in his cabinet...and was wondering about some cooling methods...he thought of making 2 cuts in his cabinet in the back...inserting two PC fans...

    any ideas?

  2. Software & Hardware   -   #2
    clocker's Avatar Shovel Ready
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    Quote Originally Posted by Global Jihad View Post
    Is there a way to convert a PC fan to use the ac plugs for US...anyone think of anything? My friend has a surround set reciever that creates alot of heat in his cabinet...and was wondering about some cooling methods...he thought of making 2 cuts in his cabinet in the back...inserting two PC fans...

    any ideas?
    No, a 12VDC computer fan cannot be converted to run on 120VAC but such fans are common as dirt.
    "I am the one who knocks."- Heisenberg

  3. Software & Hardware   -   #3
    suprafreak6's Avatar Suprafreak6 is Back!
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    oh cool...thanks...do you think its a good idea tho? setting up two fans in the rear or top to vent out the heat...?

  4. Software & Hardware   -   #4
    tesco's Avatar woowoo
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    Sure is, as long as they're quiet so it doesn't become annoying while you're trying to listen.

    You also could probably find a 120v ac to 12v dc transformer to use but i'm sure finding a 120v fan would be easier.

  5. Software & Hardware   -   #5
    If he's willing to go inside and cut holes for fans he should be able to find a 12v dc supply inside the box. Most modern electronics have ac coming in because thats what we have coming to the house, Once in the box though its much more efficient to change to dc and 12volts is quite common. If your very observant you might even find it marked on the board inside the box. Its common to use 12 volts dc to light up the front panels. There could also be a transformer where the power comes in and if your lucky it could be well marked and will show you where the 12v + and - outputs are, commonly red for + and black for -.

  6. Software & Hardware   -   #6
    harrycary's Avatar Poster
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    I used an old AC adapter (from a cordless phone me thinks). it had an output of 12V DC, 200mA. just read the fine print before you try it.

  7. Software & Hardware   -   #7
    A dc brick is not a bad idea. It means no fooling with the wiring inside the box but on the otherhand the device will now require two sockets to run it. Then again, you could solder wires onto the bricks prongs, wrap them up with plastic tape and connect the other end of the wires to the ac coming into the unit. This would allow you to operate the whole shebang on one plug and if you could find a convienient place for the brick, hide it inside the box.

    A brick is usually marked to show which polarity is which with a C like drawing to indicate the outside connection and a dot to indicate the inside pin or connection. But it really doesn't matter, if you get it wrong the fan will just run in reverse. Some fans have an arrow indicating the air flow direction. Its very important that you get it right or the fan will not push air well. If you examine the blades you can determine the direction because the bend of the blade will scoop air when turned in the proper direction.

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