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Thread: For JP, like.

  1. #1
    Snee's Avatar Error xɐʇuʎs BT Rep: +1
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    In the case of a book belonging to Cassius, we will use the 'Chaucer' rule to place the apostrophe.

    Pretend Chaucer Cassiuss book Cassiuses book
    Modern correct form Cassius's book


    Just apply the rule and the apostrophe will end up in the correct place. This clearly demonstrates that Cassius is singular, i.e. there is just one Cassius we are talking about, and he possesses the book.
    Source, see also this, for instance.

    This, however, allows for both.

    The way I was taught, the genitive case in english should always be formed with the addition of an "'s" for singulars, however going without seems ok today with words ending with an "s", as it's now become more a matter of phonetics.

    Initially (when the genitive form first was shaped in writing) it was a matter of spelling following phonetics as well, but for a while it was more about adhering strictly to the "correct" written form, which is where what I was taught stems from, I guess.

    From what I understand, as an aside, the addition of an apostrophe was accidental, I don't think it's clear exactly why it happened. We never added it in swedish.

  2. Lounge   -   #2
    Skweeky's Avatar Manker's web totty
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    I've got a simple rule for this, but you probably have to speak Dutch to get it

    In Dutch the genitive form is hardly ever used the way it is in English.

    E.g. When indicating 'the boy's coat' you would get something along the lines of 'the boy his coat'... So obviously you need an apostrophe

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    Snee's Avatar Error xɐʇuʎs BT Rep: +1
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    Err, the issue at hand is the addition of an "s" for singular nouns already ending with an "s", when forming genitives


    EDit: lolz, rodded by skweeky.

  4. Lounge   -   #4
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    Started reading the first link, got to "But the children
    belong to the parents, you say."

    Decided the author was an arse.

  5. Lounge   -   #5
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    Sorry, by way of explanation. The word "but" is a conjunction. It makes no sense to me that it is at the start of a sentence.

  6. Lounge   -   #6
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    Oh right, a conjunction is a word which links things.

    For example "I am a cunt however that doesn't make me a bad person".

    Or "Skizo is a faux-mod therefore I can't put him on ignore."

  7. Lounge   -   #7
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    You will see in the above that I used an apostrophe for the contraction "can't". It allows us to change "can not" to "can't".

    Contractions generally make speech, or the written word, appear less formal.

  8. Lounge   -   #8
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    You have now been learned something, in spite of yourself.

  9. Lounge   -   #9
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    And it's the weekend.

  10. Lounge   -   #10
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    Me ftw.

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