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Thread: Piolet

  1. #1
    DarkBlizzard's Avatar Poster
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    I think we should all download Piolet ( get it off the K-lite site) and share our My Shared Folder from Kazaa Lite with Piolet....so then piolet's number of mp3's will get higher. After all....we gotta make the RIAA's life as hard as possible ...

    EDIT: Does anyone know how to make Piolet not use so much PC Use-age?
    And also does anyone know if u have to have Piolet on to share?...i only downloaded Piolet so i could share my Kazaa Lite Mp3's with it.

  2. File Sharing   -   #2
    BANNED
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    so true

  3. File Sharing   -   #3
    on piolet/ blubster (same dude did both) just don't get too comfortable with the anonymity claim- i'm not saying don't use it just some info:

    (article)

    Giving Sharers Ears Without Faces


    By Xeni Jardin |

    02:00 AM Jul. 01, 2003 PT

    In response to recent threats to file traders, peer-to-peer developers say they're seeing an upsurge of interest in tools that purport to hide identities.

    The pressure comes from the Recording Industry Association of America's announcement Wednesday that it plans to sue hundreds of uploaders, and a recent court ruling requiring Verizon to reveal the names of subscribers accused of piracy.

    Blubster developer Pablo Soto of Madrid said his music-swapping service relaunched today as a secure, decentralized system providing users with anonymous accounts.

    The MP2P network (short for Manolito Peer-to-Peer) on which Blubster is based consists of more than 200,000 users sharing over 52 million files, according to Soto. The update is also said to include a new, streamlined file-distribution method that disassociates transfers from specific users.

    "The biggest privacy weakness of our previous version was the ability to query a list of shared songs for any user -- now that can be disabled," Soto said. "It may be possible to gather IP addresses from the network, but not data about what content specific users are sharing."

    Blubster uses an Internet data transfer protocol known as UDP for content look-up and transfer negotiating. Unlike the TCP protocol that serves this function in other file-sharing networks, UDP is a so-called "connectionless" method that doesn't reveal links between nodes or acknowledge transmission in an identifiable manner.

    Because UDP transfer logs don't reveal detailed information about which user at which IP address is accessing what content at what time, they are considered less vulnerable to legal discovery than TCP logs.

    "Any technology that allows people to communicate is a step in the right direction," Soto said. "This isn't just about exchanging music, this is about the right to create technology and enjoy the right to privacy."

    Developer sources told Wired News that pro-P2P coalitions are forming in the United States and Europe to centralize lobbying and public relations efforts. Coalition members are said to include Grokster, LimeWire, Blubster and others. Public announcements are expected in July.

    Philip Corwin, Washington, D.C.-based lobbyist for Kazaa distributor Sharman Networks, predicts file traders will migrate to anonymous networks and "sneaker networks" that facilitate trades among smaller groups of swappers. This is already possible through popular instant-messaging clients from Yahoo, Microsoft and America Online, and through tools such as Waste, the application created by principal Nullsoft developer Justin Frankel that facilitates secure exchanges among private groups.

    "There is no practical technological means to obliterate the public's ability to transfer files," Corwin said. "The RIAA lawsuits may create a chilling effect that deters some or causes others to limit the size of shared collections to minimize risk. It will probably drive more technologically adept consumers to systems that profess to offer more security against legal assault."

    Sharman, currently engaged in a court battle of its own with the recording industry, has yet to announce whether it will modify the Kazaa service.

    Freenet founder Ian Clarke is concerned that some P2P users could be misled by opportunistic software providers who promise anonymity as an afterthought.

    "It's not like slapping a new button on an application interface. Freenet resulted from a year of purely theoretical work, then three years of actual software development toward the goal of a completely anonymous system."

    Clarke is among a number of developers who question the industry's technical ability to accurately track illicitly shared content. For instance, MP3 fans may possess files from independent artists in their shared collections with names that could cause them to be confused with files from major-label artists.

    "How much anonymity do you want to have?" Clarke asked. "It's not a binary 'yes' or 'no.' What degree of resources are you trying to protect against? Some rogue individual or an organization capable of persuading Congress to change laws?"

    While Freenet was not designed to be an anonymous MP3-swapping network, a portion of the public apparently thinks it is: The Freenet home page received a threefold increase in hits since Wednesday's RIAA announcement, and the project received more donations in the week following than it had in the previous two months combined, according to Clarke.

    "We're constantly having to fight the misperception that it was created to facilitate the exchange of copyrighted entertainment," Clarke said. "If we suddenly start seeing tons of new users demanding functionality that would make it work like an anonymous MP3-sharing network, we'll be in a difficult position, because that's not something we care about.

    "We're concerned with the online Chinese dissident, not whether or not some guy can download the latest Britney Spears album without paying."

    http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,59448,00.html

  4. File Sharing   -   #4
    DarkBlizzard's Avatar Poster
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    I didnt even know that lol....i only downloaded it cuz paul said its good for mp3's.

  5. File Sharing   -   #5
    yeah wasn't sure if you were referring to that - i gotta check it out

  6. File Sharing   -   #6
    DarkBlizzard Posted on 8 July 2003 - 07:27
      I think we should all download Piolet ( get it off the K-lite site) and share our My Shared Folder from Kazaa Lite with Piolet....so then piolet's number of mp3's will get higher. After all....we gotta make the RIAA's life as hard as possible  ...

    EDIT: Does anyone know how to make Piolet not use so much PC Use-age?
    And also does anyone know if u have to have Piolet on to share?...i only downloaded Piolet so i could share my Kazaa Lite Mp3's with it. 
    true

  7. File Sharing   -   #7
    mogadishu's Avatar {}"_++()_><.,{}}[":+
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    it sounds great, but they need to resolve the firewall issue. I can&#39;t just shut down my firewall, and I don&#39;t have the access to open certain ports. Soulseek is great for audio, and my firewall doesn&#39;t seem to create problems.
    signature removed, check the boardrules.

  8. File Sharing   -   #8
    DarkBlizzard's Avatar Poster
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    Well Piolet is good though....try figuring it out...im sure its possible with your firewall.

  9. File Sharing   -   #9
    the dude who does soulseek ought to add an anomity thing to it. I&#39;m sorry man but it doubt piolet will rival soulseek as far as music.

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