Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: "The Willow and goul" by The Vergent Tallion.

  1. #1
    This is my latest work

    this is a question to all of you here who decide to read this.

    As far as the shadows cast, the enravelling producers fast, even i thy be yourself says i, will welcome any predatory self says thy. When the creatures rest their willowfull wings, their chief calls out and sings, "This willowfull land that follows your wings, seems to be one of many derelict things, "no!" said i, pretrude the mountains and i shall be blessed. As far as you sing, the willowfull will rest.

    by The Vergent Tallion

    this is a sort of metaphoric question, those who understand it and those who dont please express your views.

  2. The Drawing Room   -   #2
    bigboab's Avatar Poster BT Rep: +1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    30,399
    Where is Cheese when he is needed?
    Sorry the whole thing makes no sense to me.
    The best way to keep a secret:- Tell everyone not to tell anyone.

  3. The Drawing Room   -   #3
    Chip Monk's Avatar Darth Monk Like.
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,009
    I think you would really have to read it in the original Nigerian to get the proper sense.

    For example he has used one "word" on three occasions which doesn't actually exist in the English language. Now I realise Shakespeare did that all the time, but let's be fair it's not exactly Shakespeare.

    It's also difficult to see which particular poetic form he is going for. Perhaps he can enlighten us.

    In short, it's just rambling.

    Please consider my view expressed.
    You do not need to see my I.D.

  4. The Drawing Room   -   #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Monk View Post
    I think you would really have to read it in the original Nigerian to get the proper sense.

    For example he has used one "word" on three occasions which doesn't actually exist in the English language. Now I realise Shakespeare did that all the time, but let's be fair it's not exactly Shakespeare.

    It's also difficult to see which particular poetic form he is going for. Perhaps he can enlighten us.

    In short, it's just rambling.

    Please consider my view expressed.
    yes "willowfull" is an old shakespearean word used in a few extracts, it is not written to comply with a form, and i appreciate your view, it is "rambling" to most people, but i would be right to think that most people here would not have extensive knowlege of metaphoric poems.

  5. The Drawing Room   -   #5
    j2k4's Avatar en(un)lightened
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oh, please...
    Posts
    15,254
    "thy be yourself" ?

    Surely you joust...
    “Think about how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of 'em are stupider than that.” -George Carlin

  6. The Drawing Room   -   #6
    Quote Originally Posted by j2k4 View Post
    "thy be yourself" ?

    Surely you joust...
    no i do not, it is although based around the medieval era.
    please dont forget that this is a serious discussion.

  7. The Drawing Room   -   #7
    Agrajag's Avatar Just Lame
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,006
    What about "enravelling" and "pretrude", are these also old Shakespearian words.

    Not really seeing the metaphor you are grasping at.

    Like you said I have no knowledge of metaphorical poetry, so to me it's just bunkum. Looks like an attempt to write it in a pretentious manner, but bunkum none the less.

  8. The Drawing Room   -   #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Agrajag View Post
    What about "enravelling" and "pretrude", are these also old Shakespearian words.

    Not really seeing the metaphor you are grasping at.

    Like you said I have no knowledge of metaphorical poetry, so to me it's just bunkum. Looks like an attempt to write it in a pretentious manner, but bunkum none the less.
    incorrect, as i said-
    ...that most people here would not have extensive knowlege of metaphoric poems.
    As i said earlier, this is not complying to any form, so words used are not only of shakespearean, rather a mix. Part of understanding this is the careful use of the words, it is a mix between old and new, this will help you understand the metaphor in the poem.
    Last edited by mr.mystery; 10-14-2007 at 02:04 PM.

  9. The Drawing Room   -   #9
    Agrajag's Avatar Just Lame
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,006
    So where do "enravelling" and "pretrude" come from and what do they mean.

    What does "willowfull" mean.

    Maybe if you post their meanings people will be able to understand the metaphor. Indeed it will be impossible for them if they don't know what the words mean.

  10. The Drawing Room   -   #10
    enravelling: to be active in an unpredictable manner.
    pretrude: to extract life.
    willowfull: forgiving yet tiring.

    enravelling and pretrude are words first used in the Victorian era (1837-1901), first used by Lewis Carroll.

    i dont think i need to explain each and every word as this will turn into a lecture which will defeat the purpose of this thread.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •