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Thread: Some more n00b questions (faster speeds)...

  1. #1
    Hello all, just first wanted to say that this site is an excellent resource to us new folk getting into Usenet!

    A bit about myself:
    I am currently a client of Usenetserver. I typically get a 1200KB/s download and I am using all 10 connections (Grabit as the client). I am on a Time Warner cable modem (which I believe is 7MB DL 1MB UL) service.

    I've surfed the posts here and still can't get answers to my questions, which are:
    1) If I use SSH, does that mean I can DL faster than 1200KB/s? Ultimately, I'd like to increase this speed somehow.
    2) If I were to sign up to something like GigaNews' 20 connection subscription, in addition to my current Usenetserver subscription, then does that mean I could theoretically get 3600KB/s DL (or faster? Thought process being 30 open connections at one time)? <-- I have additional questions in my mind depending on the answer to this question; really the overarching question is: What does having multiple Usenet subscriptions really get me? Is it beneficial?

    Thank you all!

  2. Newsgroups   -   #2
    MultiForce's Avatar Poster
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimDimman View Post
    Hello all, just first wanted to say that this site is an excellent resource to us new folk getting into Usenet!

    A bit about myself:
    I am currently a client of Usenetserver. I typically get a 1200KB/s download and I am using all 10 connections (Grabit as the client). I am on a Time Warner cable modem (which I believe is 7MB DL 1MB UL) service.

    I've surfed the posts here and still can't get answers to my questions, which are:
    1) If I use SSH, does that mean I can DL faster than 1200KB/s? Ultimately, I'd like to increase this speed somehow.
    2) If I were to sign up to something like GigaNews' 20 connection subscription, in addition to my current Usenetserver subscription, then does that mean I could theoretically get 3600KB/s DL (or faster? Thought process being 30 open connections at one time)? <-- I have additional questions in my mind depending on the answer to this question; really the overarching question is: What does having multiple Usenet subscriptions really get me? Is it beneficial?

    Thank you all!
    1: I guess you mean SSL. It is good if your ISP throttles the ports (119 and others) and might get you getter speed if you use it.

    2: You may use several providers but I don't think you need to as I don't really think you got 7MB/s download but 7Mb (Mbit and not MegaByte/second).

    As I see it you got good speeds as it is (a bit too good)

    Stole this shit from someone:

    This is actually a good question considering most users are used to devices being rated by MB capacity, such as data storage solutions and RAM. This becomes confusing when shopping for equipment such as network devices and certain aspects of motherboard to device communication where the hardware is rated by its Mb/sec capacity. One thing to remember is that Mbs converted to MBs is not equal to an actual MB. For instance, LANs operate at(usually) 100Mb/sec. Your LAN connection can transfer 100,000,000 bits/sec at that speed(1Mb=1,000,000bits). Take 100,000,000 divided by 8(the amount of bits in a byte) and you get 12,500,000 bytes. Take that and divide by 1024(the multiplier for data storage conversions) and you get 12208 kilobytes. Do it again and you get 12 megabytes. So your LAN connection speed is only transferring 12MB/sec of information. Bits per second is used to reference transfer speeds(since data is sent a bit at a time) while bytes are used for data storage capacities(since data is stored by byte not bit, if I remember correctly).

  3. Newsgroups   -   #3
    I kinda have the same question so I won't post a new thread but I am using Comcast high speed internet with a advertised 8mbps download. I am using Newsleecher with Usenetserver encrypted SSL servers. When I first start a dl my speeds jump up to 2+mbps but then always level off at a solid 1mbps which is way below my advertised speeds and speeds I get when test it through dslreports.com speed test.

    Is there a way to increase my dl through my computer settings or is this something that is limited by either Usenetservers or Comcast?

  4. Newsgroups   -   #4
    Broken's Avatar Obama Supporter
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    I was having speed problems with UNS too. I switched to Giganews and they all disappeared. I would consider at least getting a trial account at Giganews to see if your speeds improve. If they do, even if you don't want to stay with Giganews you'll know it's time to shop for a new provider.

  5. Newsgroups   -   #5
    Quote Originally Posted by MultiForce View Post
    1: I guess you mean SSL. It is good if your ISP throttles the ports (119 and others) and might get you getter speed if you use it.

    2: You may use several providers but I don't think you need to as I don't really think you got 7MB/s download but 7Mb (Mbit and not MegaByte/second).

    As I see it you got good speeds as it is (a bit too good)

    Stole this shit from someone:

    This is actually a good question considering most users are used to devices being rated by MB capacity, such as data storage solutions and RAM. This becomes confusing when shopping for equipment such as network devices and certain aspects of motherboard to device communication where the hardware is rated by its Mb/sec capacity. One thing to remember is that Mbs converted to MBs is not equal to an actual MB. For instance, LANs operate at(usually) 100Mb/sec. Your LAN connection can transfer 100,000,000 bits/sec at that speed(1Mb=1,000,000bits). Take 100,000,000 divided by 8(the amount of bits in a byte) and you get 12,500,000 bytes. Take that and divide by 1024(the multiplier for data storage conversions) and you get 12208 kilobytes. Do it again and you get 12 megabytes. So your LAN connection speed is only transferring 12MB/sec of information. Bits per second is used to reference transfer speeds(since data is sent a bit at a time) while bytes are used for data storage capacities(since data is stored by byte not bit, if I remember correctly).
    Hi Multiforce,

    Thanks for your response!

    I did mean SSL. Not sure where SSH came from...

    Wow, yes you are right. 7Mbps, meaning, according to your snippet (thanks for that by the way! Very informative) I'm should get no better than 7,000,000/8 = 875,000 Bytes/s / 1024 = 854.5 KB/s. Right now, however, I'm watching my system run at 1186 KB/s. That means that I must be pulling 10,000,000 / 8 = 1,250,000 Bytes/s / 1024 = 1221 KB/s...

    Interesting, I wonder if Time Warner grandfathered me with the 10Mbps, instead of their standard 7Mbps???!!!

    Very eye opening. So, it looks like no matter what I do, I won't be able to increase my speed (unless I go FiOS or something like that?!?!)...

    Did I do something wrong here?

    Thanks!

  6. Newsgroups   -   #6
    Quote Originally Posted by TimDimman View Post

    Interesting, I wonder if Time Warner grandfathered me with the 10Mbps, instead of their standard 7Mbps???!!!

    Very eye opening. So, it looks like no matter what I do, I won't be able to increase my speed (unless I go FiOS or something like that?!?!)...

    Did I do something wrong here?

    Thanks!

    What area are you in? Here in NYC they changed their standard from 6/7mbps to 10mbps. So you are getting the right speed. You cannot download any faster than your max bandwidth available from your ISP, it doesn't matter what you do.

  7. Newsgroups   -   #7
    Quote Originally Posted by EyeBaller View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TimDimman View Post

    Interesting, I wonder if Time Warner grandfathered me with the 10Mbps, instead of their standard 7Mbps???!!!

    Very eye opening. So, it looks like no matter what I do, I won't be able to increase my speed (unless I go FiOS or something like that?!?!)...

    Did I do something wrong here?

    Thanks!

    What area are you in? Here in NYC they changed their standard from 6/7mbps to 10mbps. So you are getting the right speed. You cannot download any faster than your max bandwidth available from your ISP, it doesn't matter what you do.
    The website still states 7Mbps, perhaps they did change and didn't update the site...when I initially signed up back in '99, it was 10Mbps. I haven't changed anything since.

    "You cannot download any faster than your max bandwidth available from your ISP, it doesn't matter what you do."

    This is the realization I'm painfully coming to. I didn't realize at first that 1200KB/s was my maximum (essentially, my ISP cap). When I saw posts touting larger numbers, I thought something was wrong with my connection. Evidently, those posts are a red herring...

    Tim

    I found a little blurb on Time Warner's site which stated that Mbps = 1024Kbps

    Therefore 10Mbps = 1024 Kbps / 8 = 1280 KBps...
    Last edited by TimDimman; 01-07-2008 at 05:36 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

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