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Thread: JP, or someone else who knows stuff about lawyering

  1. #1
    Skweeky's Avatar Manker's web totty
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    Gonnae explain to me what the difference is between a lawyer, a solicitor and a barrister?

    I was watching that knew barrister programme on the telly box last night and I am confused about the whole thing

  2. Lounge   -   #2
    Something Else's Avatar sex a wolf in a bag BT Rep: +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70
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    Is it....type of wig.


  3. Lounge   -   #3
    Something Else's Avatar sex a wolf in a bag BT Rep: +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70BT Rep +70
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    Or length of wig.


  4. Lounge   -   #4
    enoughfakefiles's Avatar Ad ministrator
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    Isn't it they're allowed to wear wigs in court

  5. Lounge   -   #5
    Lawyers and solicitors are pretty much the same entity as I understand it. They do a lot of donkey work and speak in defence of lesser crimes in the magistrate's court.

    When things go beyond that to the higher courts, they feed information and support to barristers who wear wigs and are quite partial to sado-masochistic sexual practices and also talk good.

  6. Lounge   -   #6
    enoughfakefiles's Avatar Ad ministrator
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    Quote Originally Posted by cilice View Post
    When things go beyond that to the higher courts, they feed information and support to barristers who wear wigs and are quite partial to sado-masochistic sexual practices and also talk good.
    Rly

    We might have to hire one for our empoyment tribunal case

  7. Lounge   -   #7
    IdolEyes787's Avatar Persona non grata
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    Quote Originally Posted by cilice View Post

    are quite partial to sado-masochistic sexual practices .
    I hear cross dressing will do that to you.
    Last edited by IdolEyes787; 11-26-2008 at 10:12 PM.

  8. Lounge   -   #8
    Quote Originally Posted by IdolEyes787 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cilice View Post

    are quite partial to sado-masochistic sexual practices .
    I hear cross dressing will do that to you.
    Noice.

    I bet the pre-edit didn't contain 'I hear'.

    You're getting used to the lounge, dammit.

  9. Lounge   -   #9
    I suppose the distinction between lawyers and solicitors would be that lawyers tend to prostitute themselves in the civil courts in circumstances which have either been ultimately rejected by the magistrate's/higher court or have been deemed not worth prosecuting in the first instance.

    Longest sentence without punctuation of the year award.

  10. Lounge   -   #10
    JPaul's Avatar Fat Secret Agent
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    Lawyer is a generic term.

    Solicitors deal with civil matters and if they are criminally trained fairly minor criminal matters. They will appear in the Sheriff Court, in Scotland, or the lower Courts in England. They cannot appear in the High Court, they do not have right of audience. If they are prosecutors they work for The Procurator Fiscal and are salaried. If they work for the defence they are in private practice and charge for their work.

    Barristers are criminal lawyers with right of audience in the High Court. They can actually work in the lower Courts as well but rarely do. Unless the defendant (accused in Scotland) can afford their exorbitant fees. QCs are Barristers who have been selected as Queen's Council. They are like ubber Barristers. In Scotland they are known as Advocates. If they are employed by the Crown (The Lord Advocate) they work for the prosecution and are known as an Advocate Depute. Other QCs normally do defence work, however they can be instructed by The Crown. Some refuse to do prosecution work.

    That's kind of a simplistic explanation. I've jumped between Scotland and England (in a legal sense) because I can.

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