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Thread: x.264 File Sizing Questions

  1. #1
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    I've occasionally leeched some of these HD postings on Usenet, and have long wondered exactly why the recoded file size (other than the full BR rips at 20+Gb of course)doesn't always equal the size of a DVD5 or DVD9. The person recoding?

    I understand that maybe a movie of close to BR 50Gb size, with one or more of the HD-audio streams, might be recoded down to something in the 10-25 range or thereabouts. But I continually see recodes with 'standard' Dolby or DTS way over the DVD5/9 limit, and have wondered why, since they can only be either stored on a hard drive, or burned to expensive BR disc for storage.

    Any thoughts as to the thinking behind this? I also should note that many recodes are of popular movies in BOTH dvd6 and dvd9 sizes, but with little (if any) technical info (like as to average bit rate) as is commonplace in the SD recode world.

    Just musing....would be nice to know the thinking (if any) behind some of this....
    Last edited by Beck38; 06-14-2009 at 07:14 PM.

  2. File Sharing   -   #2
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    The scene rules require certain file sizes keyed to dvds just like SD rules, but p2p groups care little about that. (ESiR, CtrlHD, HiDT, EUREKA, DON, etc.) Generally these p2p groups stay close to the file sizes, but on "good" movies they usually opt for quality over the file size rules. Especially 1080p encodes.

    Most HD site users store these files on HTPCs, Externals, or just watch them on their usual PC, so backing up to dvd is rare. If anyone is doing it, they are probably archiving scene releases in rar format. Besides, using mkvmerge or something you can split the mkv to fit on two dvds.

  3. File Sharing   -   #3
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    Yes, I get the 'put it on the hard drive' thinking, it's just that the cost analysis of doing so for very long (or a lot) doesn't make much sense as even with the pricing of large drive arrays, the cost of even DVD9 burned storage (at ~$1.30/disc), is about 1/2 to 1/3rd the cost (of hard drive storage, not to mention expandability).

    But I guess that I tend to think 'long term'/'very large collection' terms. When I first took the plunge on burning DVD's, I thought my storage scheme would work just fine, but later had to re-vamp (and mostly re-do) everything. Lots of time and effort kinda wasted in the first couple of years.

    But I guess you're probably right that folks are thinking that perhaps doing x264 is mainly a 'stopgap' until BR discs get 'cheap', whatever that is. I just think it's going to take a very long time, maybe better than 10 years before we'll see <$10 from the >$30 level we have now; and burnable blank discs will have to drop off the cliff as well.

    But watching on a PC is 'cruel and unusual' punishment, I'd think folks would opt for one of the NMT's (network media tank) set-top boxes (Popcorn Hour etc., <$200), I sure did. No more fooling around with viewing programs, plug-ins, codecs, HD capable video cards /drivers, that work half the time.

    Well, I guess I'll have to 'do it myself' if I want it 'done right'. That's what got me into recoding DVD's in the first place some 7 years ago. It just doesn't make much sense to go to the effort and yield a result of, say, 7.2GB, when one might as well loosen it up to a DVD9 anyway, no matter where you're going to store it at.

    But I guess that's just me!

  4. File Sharing   -   #4
    iLOVENZB's Avatar FST Crew BT Rep: +1
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    Not everyone watches x264 rips on their PC, unless it's a HTPC which will probably be hooked up to a 60" monitor .

    The scene has always had this mentality of backing up to a disk medium (3.5", CD, DVD). The rules will probably change in the next 10 years when we start seeing PB HDD's. Even PS3 games sizrs are DVD5/9
    "Computer games don't affect kids; I mean if Pac-Man affected us as kids, we'd all be running around in darkened rooms, munching magic pills and listening to repetitive electronic music"

  5. File Sharing   -   #5
    I don't know why, but a lot of my mates download the 1080p versions of movies which are usually above 20gb
    I stick with the 720p versions, which play fine, (after some transcoding), on my ps3

    I find 720p versions to be in the 2gb-8gb range (some animations are 2gb)
    And 1080p versions to be in the 10gb-20gb+

  6. File Sharing   -   #6
    iLOVENZB's Avatar FST Crew BT Rep: +1
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8khan8 View Post
    I don't know why, but a lot of my mates download the 1080p versions of movies which are usually above 20gb
    I stick with the 720p versions, which play fine, (after some transcoding), on my ps3

    I find 720p versions to be in the 2gb-8gb range (some animations are 2gb)
    And 1080p versions to be in the 10gb-20gb+
    Depends if it's a scene or a p2p rip. Most scene 720p rips are 4GB (with the exception of a few groups).

    I found a few Animation 720p rips (scene) to be under 4GB.
    "Computer games don't affect kids; I mean if Pac-Man affected us as kids, we'd all be running around in darkened rooms, munching magic pills and listening to repetitive electronic music"

  7. File Sharing   -   #7
    vegasx's Avatar Poker Enthusiastic
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    I'm with you man, I stick with 720p...1080p is not worth the extra GB...

  8. File Sharing   -   #8
    manu1991's Avatar Ancient Philospher BT Rep: +3
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    With Players like the WD Media Player , Popcorn Media Hour etc , DVD's are becoming passe

    Also about your HDD vs DVD cost analogy

    Seagate's 1.5 TB HDD costs 119$ on newegg , that's just 0.08 $ per GB , i doubt you can go cheaper with DVD's
    Last edited by manu1991; 07-07-2009 at 02:58 AM.

  9. File Sharing   -   #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by manu1991 View Post
    With Players like the WD Media Player , Popcorn Media Hour etc , DVD's are becoming passe

    Also about your HDD vs DVD cost analogy

    Seagate's 1.5 TB HDD costs 119$ on newegg , that's just 0.08 $ per GB , i doubt you can go cheaper with DVD's
    This is gonna be a 'yet, but' kinda answer.

    I have 2 of the seagate 1.5TB's, and lots of additional storage as well. I'm looking at several large ('near-commercial') network storage arrays, and have a nice spreadsheet where I 'toss the numbers'.

    Just go a bit further on the costs: .08/gig = 34cents per dvd5 (I routinely by Ritek inkjet printable blanks for <25cents per), and dvd9 would be some 64 cents. Now, that's about half the price of top Verbatim blanks (approx $1.30 at going prices), so yes, pure drive prices look like the way to go (but again, one must figure in the cost of the machine that drive is hooked to).

    Make those drives fairly decent in a solid raid array, and the cost of storage gets to 2-3 times that of the optical removables.

    IF the pricing on DVD9's will continue their s-l-o-w decent, then perhaps fixed arrays can be used as a 'stop-gap' until the costs come better into line. I"m looking to do some kind of raid array fairly soon, the how large/how expensive numbers haven't been fully ground out yet.

    All the comments on sizing are correct, in that most folks doing x264 don't seem to care much about size/bit rates, others care about bit rates, and a few do care about sizing. Like I kinda said, I guess if you want it done to what you want, you gotta do it yourself. Okay, that's my project for this summer!

  10. File Sharing   -   #10
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    I've also noticed that Scene file-size standards are increasingly being ignored. At the start of the decade, it seemed that virtually all DVD rips were 700MB files, but these days the file sizes are all over the place.

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