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Thread: Nuked Releases Guide (What They Mean)

  1. #1
    SonsOfLiberty's Avatar The Lonely Wanderer
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    Urgent



    Do you ever see reasons for stuff being nuked? I'm sure you do, so I stumbled across a few pages that gave exact details on what reasons there are for Nuke's and have them explained.

    In the warez scene, nuke refers to labeling content as "bad", for reasons which might include unusable quality, virus-infected content, or deceptively labeled ("fake") content. When a title is "nuked", a message is attached to its listing informing patrons of its "nuked" status, as well as the specific nature of the problem.

    Contrary to what the term implies, a nuke does not actually destroy offending content or prevent anyone from downloading it. A nuke merely serves as a cautionary flag to potential users.


    If a group publishes a release which already has been released by another release group, it's a dupe (duplicate). Then the release will be nuked. This means that it's marked as a bad release. Releasegroup try to avoid nukes, since this will give them a bad reputation. Except for dupe, releases can be nuked for other reasons too. First of all, there are 2 types of nuke:

    - Global Nuke

    Nuked because of the release itself. It is nuked because something is wrong with the release, for example: sound errors, dupe, freezing video, bad rip, etc. If a group realise there is something wrong, they can request a nuke. Common nuke releases:
    Dupe
    Bad aspect ratio
    Bad inverse telecine, the process of converting framerates was incorrect
    Interlaced, black lines on movement as the field order is incorrect

    - Local Nuke

    Nuked because of the environement. Individual sites will nuke for breaking their rules, for example: no telesyncs, no dvd's subbed in languages other then English and Dutch, etc. So there is nothing wrong with the release. Because of these releases are nuked locally, they can still be traded on other sites.

    stolen.from.p2p

    This basically means that the scene group which pred the release stole it from another source - specifically a peer to peer network (p2p) in this case. In most cases, this means a private BitTorrent tracker, which obtained and released the copy of a movie faster than any other scene source. This nuke reason will not affect your viewer’s experience and many sceners consider it useless as we basically steal the movies anyway.

    stolen.src

    Stolen source. Similar or same as the above nuke reason. Scene groups can steal the video or audio also from each other, apart from stealing from peer to peer networks.

    bad.res

    Bad image resolution. The scene rules define allowed image resolutions and their aspect ratios. If a movie doesn’t fit in these rules, it means the image will be probably malformed in a certain way. Many advanced video players allow to change the image resolution, so this can be sometimes fixed at your computer.

    bad.ar

    Bad aspect ratio. A similar reason to the above one. Each video was originally filmed and released in a specific aspect ratio (horizontal vs. vertical side). The most common AR is 2.35:1 which is for example a resolution of 640272 pixels. Bad aspect ratio leads to inproportional image, where characters appear to be either too wide or, more often, too tall. This can be also fixed with some media players.

    dupe

    Dupe means simply a dupe. The nuked release was already released by another group earlier, so the nuked one is basically useless, doubled. This doesn’t really matter if you don’t care about the strict scene rules.

    undersized

    A release is nuked for being undersized when it doesn’t fully use the capacity of one or two CDs. This means that the final rip is for example 680 MB, while it could be 700 MB and offer a better quality of image and audio. Once again, this is not a serious deal unless it’s undersized by hundreds of megabytes.

    oversized

    Really you can't already figure this one out?

    bad.crop, overcropped

    Movies on DVD contain black parts of the image above and below the actual video. In order to decrease the final size and offer the best possible quality, these black parts must be removed before encoding and releasing in xvid. Sometimes, scene groups don’t properly remove / crop these parts and it means that the image misses top or bottom part, therefore you don’t see the whole scene. Cropping is often used also for removing watermarks or hardcoded subtitles, but it still means a serious loss of the image. The other, not so common extreme, is when a group forgets to remove these black boxes.

    bad.ivtc, no.ivtc

    Quite a common nuke reason which affects mostly lower-quality releases. IVTC means “inverse telecine” and it’s basically a process of converting a movie (usually PAL) with high FPS (30 frames per second) to lower FPS (for example 24) in order to save space and offer better image quality. This conversion often goes wrong (bad.ivtc) or completely lacks (no.ivtc, lazy sceners)). As a result, the image appears to be jerky and the final release uses too much space for no reason.

    interlaced

    The image contains visible black lines, which often cause the video to be completely unwatchable. These black lines are visible mostly during movement on the image and are caused by incorrect field order. I won’t go into details explaining the reasons for this - it’s caused by different way of displaying frames and fields (half-frames) in the video, more details are available for example here. It’s highly recommended to not download any interlaced release.

    cbr.audio

    Audio can be either CBR (constant bit rate), or VBR (variable bit rate). According to the scene rules, all releases should contain VBR audio, so any release with CBR is instantly nuked. Variable bit rate allows better quality, according to the current sound, while constant one sets the same quality for the whole movie, including the quiet parts. However, releases with AC3 audio almost always use CBR. It’s often hard to distinguish the difference between CBR and VBR for an untrained ear, so this nuke reason isn’t too serious if you don’t care about the rules.

    bad.fps

    Bad frame rate. The frame rate should be close to the original framerate. Not a very common nuke reason, but it’s better to beware any release with this nuke.

    mislabeled

    A release trying to look like a better quality rip. A good example would be an R5 rip from Russian video source released as dvdrip - the difference isn’t that big in this case and scene groups always get more props for releasing dvdrips. The another case can be a typo or wrong year in the release name.

    grp.req

    A nuke requested by the release group. Happens when a scene group releases something and realize it’s completely wrong, not working or simply bad, so they request a nuke.

    oos, out.of.sync

    Out of sync, audio isn’t synced with video. Extremely annoying mistake which makes most of such release completely unwatchable. This happens very often with cams, telesyncs and telecines, which require a synchronization of audio and video from different source. Some releases are completely out of sync, while others have this problem only for a few seconds or minutes.

    bad.pack

    Bad packing. The group didn’t pack their release properly, according to scene rules. This means they either forgot to pack it into 15/20/50 MB RARs or it’s completely impossible to unpack it.

    invalid.proper

    Proper is a release fixing other, previously nuked release. When a certain group releases proper and the first release is actually fine, the new one becomes nuked for invalid proper.

    qpel.not.allowed

    QPEL or quarter pixel is a feature of modern encoding codecs such as H.264 which allows better and more efficient compression. Videos encoded with quarter-pixel precision motion vectors require up to twice as much processing power to encode, and 30-60% more processing power to decode. Thus, such releases often cause software problems or are completely unplayable at certain DVD players.

    ghosting

    Annoying feature of a release, which result into ghost effect during every movement in the movie. It’s caused by inproper encoding and can’t be easily fixed.

    field.shifted, dupe.frames, blended.frames, custom.quant.matrix

    Other mostly serious faults affecting the image, caused during encoding the final video.

    divx.not.allowed, no.audio, missing.audio, get.rerip, get.proper

    What's to explain?



    There you have a quick NUKE guide, so now if anyone is confused you won't be, just because something is Nuked does not mean it is bad......
    Last edited by SonsOfLiberty; 06-29-2009 at 03:49 PM.
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  2. Guides and Tutorials   -   #2
    newsgroupie
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    The controversy is that releases often get nuked because they violated a minor scene rule -- even though there is absolutely nothing wrong with the material itself.

    Most people (outside of scene menbers) really don't care about all these arcane scene rules, they just want a watchable movie.

    Which is probably why aXXo is both loved and hated by so many.

  3. Guides and Tutorials   -   #3
    SonsOfLiberty's Avatar The Lonely Wanderer
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    That's why I stated, just because it's Nuked doesn't mean it's bad, not all those are minor, oos, bad-pack, ghosting, interlacd, etc...
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  4. Guides and Tutorials   -   #4
    captive's Avatar speaks.his.mind
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    when a release is nuked for trivial reasons it is hard to understand, but the scene rules are why so many releases are such good quality now. people in the scene [which i used to be], and now non scene are following the rules now which is why in my opinion, so many non scene releases are good quality too.

    it is also a good guide for downloaders, if i saw an xvid film @ say 500-600mb i would not download it because i would be very dubious to its quality.

    the rules for me are in general a good and neccessary thing.

  5. Guides and Tutorials   -   #5
    SonsOfLiberty's Avatar The Lonely Wanderer
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    Yeah, if anything is under 800mb I won't touch, but most XviD's rips now-a-days are average 1.50GB....single file which is the non-scene, which I like better than the 2CD crap, do they not know DVD's were invented?
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  6. Guides and Tutorials   -   #6
    Quote Originally Posted by zot View Post
    The controversy is that releases often get nuked because they violated a minor scene rule -- even though there is absolutely nothing wrong with the material itself.

    Most people (outside of scene menbers) really don't care about all these arcane scene rules, they just want a watchable movie.
    Wether its trivial or not, soon after something is nuked it is usually propered, ensuring a better quality of whatever it is that got nuked in the first place is pre-ed and stored some place forever.

    i like axxo's work as most times i just want to watch a movie and dont really care where it came from but i also dont like it when people thing they are experts for buying dvd to avi software that doesnt work lol

  7. Guides and Tutorials   -   #7
    newsgroupie
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    Besides technical reasons for a nuking, there are also political ones.

    Some releases get nuked because they were discovered to use "stolen" material from another scene group.

    It seems the Scene does not tolerate lamers.

  8. Guides and Tutorials   -   #8
    SonsOfLiberty's Avatar The Lonely Wanderer
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    the scene steals too, "stolen" is not a great nuke, since after all they steal the source themselves
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  9. Guides and Tutorials   -   #9
    newsgroupie
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    SOL, I seem to remember some of your ed2k releases being repackaged by someone named "King Alp" - is that correct?

  10. Guides and Tutorials   -   #10
    SonsOfLiberty's Avatar The Lonely Wanderer
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    Really? Maybe that's the "virus writer" who tried taking down ShareLive. If it is, I probably 1, don't remember, 2, never heard of it before, but then again, it could've been at sites I never visited. Why anyone would repack them is beyond me since they have to re-share them, I'm pretty sure some are still shared, I had many alias, all though pertaining to my nick.
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