Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Linux doesn't seem practical

  1. #1
    A long time ago I tried several linux distros but was never able to get it working properly with my isp, network card, or who knows what the problem was. So I ignored linux until now. I decided to give ubuntu a try after hearing about how secure it was from spyware and viruses. Also just wanted to try something different. After install I excitedly wait for the reboot and tada my win7 desktop loads. I google about why the grub screen isn't showing up. Apparently windows 7 does not like anything changing the mbr. I find many suggestions most taking me into the command line and typing a bunch of stuff that I have no idea what it means. Then further down I read most people talking about how there is still no proper fix yet.

    So I downloaded the super grub cd and was able to get into the ubuntu desktop finally.The main screen of grub cd didn't make any sense to me but your suppose to click pick language and help for the real screen. Why couldn't they just title it start here or something like that? So I figure that my options are to use a cd every time I want to boot, or buy another hard drive for which I can build a switch or change the boot order in the bios.
    After sleeping on it I realize I won't be spending much time in linux simply because the programs I need aren't supported for it. My whole pile of dvd rebuilding tools is a good reason. I don't want to worry if wine may or may not work with every new version of a windows program comes out that I need.

    So why keep switching over to linux just so I can browse the internet? The practicality of linux sucks. The only reason I would consider using it is for relatives or friends computer that is only for internet and they keep mucking everything up with spyware.

  2. Software & Hardware   -   #2
    Poster BT Rep: +1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    30
    Windows 7 and Ubuntu work side by side perfectly for me, I have it on my laptop, Ubuntu is much faster and loads up far quicker than its windows counterpart, but takes ages to get anything done, i.e. compiling programs looking for drivers and messing with terminals and such.

    It also has this strange thing where it forgets my root pass, but all in all I think its not a bad operating system, you must also keep in mind that Linux is free, and is developed by a community rather than a company of paid individuals

    Also with Linux I found it’s also a good idea too have a thirst for knowledge! Especially when it comes to using the terminal, and working out the commands!
    Last edited by cloggy45; 07-21-2009 at 03:11 AM.

  3. Software & Hardware   -   #3
    Are you using grub with windows 7? Same or separate hard drives? It would be nice if I could have them both running at the same time and switch like you can with windows desktops.

    It would be a lot of fun to learn about linux but I'm having trouble finding the motivation to do so because the programs I use on a regular basis are all in windows.

    Anydvd(needed for the bluray support), dvd rebuilder, makemkv , newsleecher, just to name a few. Maybe some of them would work with wine but I think they like the real windows better. Ipod touch support is also very limited.

  4. Software & Hardware   -   #4
    Now, I'm just a n00b(in FST rank), but I can have my say:

    The reason you're having a hard time is because it's Linux. As cloggy45 stated, Linux, is for (in our opinion) people who have a thirst for knowledge, and/or people who want something more than Winblows or Mac. Almost everyone will have the problems you've had. The trick is to just figure them out, and then help out the next noobie that has the same problem. That's how the community runs.

    When I started with Linux (Ubuntu), I had the hardest time connecting to my wireless network. Since then, I've learned a substantial amount about the drivers, modules, inards, and outards of Linux. With this knowledge, I help others where I can.

    You need to gather up that motivation you say you lack if you want to do well with Linux. Even Ubuntu, which babies you.
    I have Slack, Ubuntu, and Win7, and they all work well(enough) together.

    Please don't think Linux is impractical. Closed source software is the real impracticality.
    Last edited by Recursacro; 08-17-2009 at 02:53 AM.

  5. Software & Hardware   -   #5
    Fwir a major problem with linux is that there are so many distros. Nothing can be standardized and software writers don't want to build a package for 50 different o/s. How many linux users don't dual boot or even have a windows box in their home? I'm guessing very few. Maybe people use linux because they truly like tinkering with computers or they feel that microsoft is evil or both. As for being something more than windows? how so? What can I do in linux that I can't do in windows? The only advantage that I see is being free and immunity to virus/malware.

    Open office is a wonderful set of software but to be honest every review I have seen favors the microsoft offering by at least a small edge. That being said I still install open office on a lot of peoples computers that ask me about a office application.
    My point is that windows will usually have better software because people are actually paid.

    If every program I needed was as well supported as something like open office in linux then I would gladly make the switch. Until then I will stick with windows and have the choice of high quality paid programs and open source.
    Last edited by Sporkk; 08-17-2009 at 04:20 AM.

  6. Software & Hardware   -   #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jedispork View Post
    Fwir a major problem with linux is that there are so many distros. Nothing can be standardized and software writers don't want to build a package for 50 different o/s. How many linux users don't dual boot or even have a windows box in their home? I'm guessing very few. Maybe people use linux because they truly like tinkering with computers or they feel that microsoft is evil or both. As for being something more than windows? how so? What can I do in linux that I can't do in windows? The only advantage that I see is being free and immunity to virus/malware.

    Open office is a wonderful set of software but to be honest every review I have seen favors the microsoft offering by at least a small edge. That being said I still install open office on a lot of peoples computers that ask me about a office application.
    My point is that windows will usually have better software because people are actually paid.

    If every program I needed was as well supported as something like open office in linux then I would gladly make the switch. Until then I will stick with windows and have the choice of high quality paid programs and open source.
    A couple things:

    The the vast variety of distros is a good thing. People can choose what fits them.

    Linux is not immune to viruses; it just gets updated more often, so holes are fixed faster.

    I thought M$ can no longer sell their Word Processor/Office Suite...

    I suppose I take a look at this as a programmer, so Linux has all the potential in the world, and if I want to change something, I can. Even if I look at this as Mr. Average-Joe, Linux is a better choice because it's free, the software for it is free, and I can find a distro that fits my needs. If I want one that babies me like Windows, I'll use Ubuntu.

    It is people like you that hold Linux back. The reason Windows does so well is because of the community. The majority of people use it. If everyone that used Windows used a flavor of Linux, it would be supported much better, and people would generally have a better understanding of computers.
    Moreover, OpenOffice (along with many other projects) would benefit substantially from a larger community. If everyone stopped using Word '07 and used the OO suite, then they (the team) would be sure to improve their software.

    Also, take a look at Windows' file system compared to Linux's. NTFS vs. ext4.... hmmmm...

    The point you have is that Linux doesn't have the software that Windows does. The only reason it doesn't is because not enough people use the projects that get started in Linux. The projects then die off, and the closed-source programs for Windows prevail.

  7. Software & Hardware   -   #7
    Ok now that I've had a nap I can think a bit better. I am all for open source. I apologize if I sounded like I'm trying to say linux sucks. I do use open office over m$office because the wonderful people that created it make it available for windows too. I would so much like to wipe windows off my computer but unfortunately there is some software that I really like to use and may never work its way onto linux. Anydvd is one of them. I can rip blu ray videos with ease but with linux its probably some 5 page process and may not even work consistently. I also like using my ipod touch which has no support in linux yet. While amarok may be ok i doubt it even comes close to media monkey.

    These are just a few things. Linux may never over take windows and while microsoft is evil im not going to deprive myself of programs I may never see in linux. I did install ubuntu on my laptop and I was very impressed it even installed the old usb wifi adapter without a snag! I may do some experimenting with ubuntu on the laptop and gradually move over but certainly not on the main desktop for now.
    Last edited by Sporkk; 08-17-2009 at 09:50 PM.

  8. Software & Hardware   -   #8
    Yeah, sorry for ranting. I'm quite passionate about this topic. I apologize if you were offended at all.

    What you are doing is the way to go. I still use Windows because of some programs, but if I can use Linux for it, I do. Anyway, I hope things go will with Ubuntu.

    Cheers.

  9. Software & Hardware   -   #9
    I made another attempt to dual boot ubuntu. I reformatted my pc and put my legal copy of windows vista back on it.
    Then I installed ubuntu on a separate partition. I figured I wouldn't have issues with the auto install of grub on ubuntu 9.04 since vista has been out for a while. Well vista ends up loading and no sign of a grub screen.

    After screwing up my mbr last time I would like a solution that doesn't require changing it. Would adding a second hard drive and changing the boot order in the bios work very well? Another solution I've thought about doing is just boot linux from cd. Would super grub disk be the best solution for this method? or maybe a flash drive loaded with super grub disk? I am leaning towards the bootable cd method so I don't have to add another drive. It is a bit of a hassle but really the only time I would need to reboot is to use anydvd so I can load up my media server.

    Which brings me to another question. I have a networked media tank and I store the files on my secondary hard drive with ntfs format. Would it be possible to auto mount and share my ntfs folder under linux?

    After further thought I may also switch mp3 players so I can completely disconnect from apple. I don't want a mp3 player that charges me for a software upgrade or I need to shell out big bucks just to change a battery.

    Hopefully you can help. Here's your chance to recruit a new linux user. If I'm able to do most of my work in linux I can at least refrain from the urge to buy windows 7.

  10. Software & Hardware   -   #10
    Heh, I might be on Win7 right now.

    Well, as for the booting... if you install Ubuntu after Windows, everything should go fine with Grub. What I think the problem is is that your Windows partition kept the boot flag. If you booted into GParted live CD or something like it, you could change which partition has the boot flag. If Linux does, then Grub will load, and you'll be able to choose which to boot into.

    As for a new HDD, that's the best way, in my opinion. That solves all problems with conflicting operating systems. I have three 500GB HDDs, one Win7, one Slackware (Linux), and the other is formatted to NTFS, and I keep files from both Windows and Linux on it. It's for backing up.

    Now, if you have separate hard drives, or even separate partitions, you can access the other from Linux. On my laptop I have Ubuntu and Win7, and I can access all of my Win7 files from Ubuntu. It mounts automagically, so it's nice and easy.

    the iPod Touch shouldn't be an issue. I did a quick Google search of:

    iPod Touch Ubuntu

    And I found this link:

    http://ipodtouchtricks.net/ipod-touc...-ubuntu-linux/

    There were others too. Check them out. Don't bother with a new .mp3 player, support shouldn't be hard to find.

    If I missed something, tell me. Hope I helped.

    Oh: ubuntuforums.org

    The best community ever. They will help you with anything.

    EDIT:
    One could always install Windows in a virtual box under Linux. That way they could use their Windows programs, but still be running Linux. I did that for a while.
    Last edited by Recursacro; 08-19-2009 at 01:46 AM. Reason: Another idea.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •