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Thread: UK File-Sharers To Be 'Cut Off'

  1. #1
    UK File-Sharers To Be 'Cut Off'
    Auguist 25, 2009 10:45am

    The government has published new measures that could see people who illegally download films and music cut off from the net.

    The amendment to the Digital Britain report would see regulator Ofcom given greater powers to tackle pirates.

    The technical measures are likely to include suspending the net accounts of "hardcore copyright pirates".

    It is believed that Business Secretary Lord Mandelson has intervened personally to beef up the policy.

    The Digital Britain report, published in June, gave Ofcom until 2012 to consider whether technical measures to catch pirates were necessary.

    However, according to a statement from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills released on Tuesday, that timeframe is now considered "too long to wait".

    Stephen Timms, minister for Digital Britain, explained the change of heart.

    "We've been listening carefully to responses to the consultation this far, and it's become clear there are widespread concerns that the plans as they stand could delay action, impacting unfairly upon rights holders," he said.

    It proposes that internet service providers (ISPs) are obliged to take action against repeat infringers and suggests that the cost of tracking down persistent pirates be shared 50:50 between ISPs and rights holders.

    The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills denied that it had changed its position since the publication of Digital Britain and said that the recommendations were open to consultation.

    "We are simply adding new ideas to the table that could potentially make the whole system more flexible and provide a quicker way to bring in technical measures," it said in a statement.

    'Disproportionate'

    ISPs have repeatedly argued that it is not their job to police the web.

    The Internet Service Providers' Association (ISPA) said it was "disappointed by the proposal to force ISPs to suspend users' accounts".

    "ISPA and consumer groups consider disconnection of users to be a disproportionate response, a view that was recently supported by the European Parliament," it said in a statement.

    European politicians recently ruled that cutting off someone's internet connection could be a breach of their human rights. The challenge came in response to France's tough policy on file-sharers.

    ISPA also said that the changes had been proposed "without consultation with the internet industry".

    Andrew Ferguson, editor of broadband website ThinkBroadband, thinks the U-turn makes a mockery of the original Digital Britain report.

    "One wonders why Stephen Carter bothered to write the Digital Britain report, we are seeing sections of it being dropped or rewritten, and this even before the 18 implementation projects have got off the ground," he said.

    He is also concerned that suspending accounts could hit soft targets such as teenagers.

    "Cutting off an internet connection could lead to serious ramifications for people, for example home workers where their teenagers use it in the evening," he said.

    Campaign body the Open Rights Group (ORG) said the proposals raised a lot of issues.

    "Removing peoples' ability to get online curtails their freedom of speech. There are issues about whether innocent people will be affected and those who share internet connections.

    "It seems crazy that as the music and film industry are starting to make money online and file-sharing is reducing that the government goes for such a harsh clamp-down," said Jim Killock, executive director of ORG.

    Global Issue

    However, the move has not been criticised by all.

    The BPI, which represents the recorded music industry in Britain, welcomed the government's decision.

    "'Digital piracy is a serious problem and a real threat to the UK's creative industries," it said in a statement.

    "The solution to the piracy problem must be effective, proportionate and dissuasive."

    Countries around the world are grappling with how to control internet piracy. In the US, student Joel Tenebaum was last month ordered to pay $675,000 (412,000) to various record labels after admitting downloading 800 songs.

    In May, the French parliament passed legislation which would see a new state-agency sending warning letters to file sharers. If they are caught three times, they will be cut off.

    There have been protests against similar proposed legislation in Australia and New Zealand.

    It is estimated that around seven million people in the UK are involved in illegal downloads with half of all the traffic on the net in the UK being content that is shared illegally.

    The UK government has set a target of reducing the problem by at least 70% in the next few years.

    There has been speculation in the British press that Lord Mandelson intervened personally on the issue after meeting record label founder David Geffen.

    A spokesman for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills denied the link.

    "Lord Mandelson does not believe Digital Britain is even on David Geffen's radar. There was no discussion on this with Geffen," he said.

    Rob Bratby, a partner with law firm Olswang thinks the pendulum could yet swing in favour of ISPs.

    "The rights holders have been successful in putting their views to government but expect some heavy lobbying from ISPs now," he said.

    Source: BBC News

  2. News (Archive)   -   #2
    Barbarossa's Avatar mostly harmless
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    Again this story rears its ugly head.

    Peter Mandelson. Cretin.

  3. News (Archive)   -   #3
    pLugiN's Avatar Poster
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    We (pirates) just get another way ;D

  4. News (Archive)   -   #4
    Okay what about the people who download music from legitimate sources and pay for it, as soon as the download shows up their net is cut ? Smart move NOT !!!!!!

    Frankly I think the world has gone mad, Politically correct, Can`t say this can`t do that....... Ya know what ? Give the people control of our countries... WE WOULD DO A BETTER JOB.....

    They need to get out more, rather than sitting at home laying on their beds stuffed with billions of pounds and thinking what can we do tomorrow to screw peoples lives up even more.....

    1) Software manufactures - No demo`s no purchases.
    2) Digital DJ's - 200 for PPL License then if you dare to pay for music and download ( CUT OFF )
    3) No more updates as it is classed as a download.
    4) No more publicity for up and coming bands as it`s a download / upload of music ?

    What next ? 10 pence per strip of toilet roll used ?

    PATHETIC.......

  5. News (Archive)   -   #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRED_UK View Post
    Okay what about the people who download music from legitimate sources and pay for it, as soon as the download shows up their net is cut ? Smart move NOT !!!!!!

    Frankly I think the world has gone mad, Politically correct, Can`t say this can`t do that....... Ya know what ? Give the people control of our countries... WE WOULD DO A BETTER JOB.....

    They need to get out more, rather than sitting at home laying on their beds stuffed with billions of pounds and thinking what can we do tomorrow to screw peoples lives up even more.....

    1) Software manufactures - No demo`s no purchases.
    2) Digital DJ's - 200 for PPL License then if you dare to pay for music and download ( CUT OFF )
    3) No more updates as it is classed as a download.
    4) No more publicity for up and coming bands as it`s a download / upload of music ?

    What next ? 10 pence per strip of toilet roll used ?

    PATHETIC.......
    Lets not go crazy here, am sure they will have a system where legit music sources wont be mistaken for the likes TPB or anything of that sort, and well the rest of your rant makes no sense.

  6. News (Archive)   -   #6
    MODERATION BT Rep: +20BT Rep +20BT Rep +20BT Rep +20
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    They probably want us up in the streets smocking puff and fighting each other, like the other youngsters do. Cheers Gordon.

    now, how many of you would pay for the stuff youre downloading? I bet that less than 5%. I dont care if they will stop illegal downloading from the net. I refuse to pay a tenner for a shitty film and pay money to their multi billions companies, cause its a lot easier to get money from the ones who dont have than from the rich. 2 words: up yours

  7. News (Archive)   -   #7
    This will be good news for all the non UK based seedbox providers.

  8. News (Archive)   -   #8
    QPD's Avatar Poster BT Rep: +25BT Rep +25BT Rep +25BT Rep +25BT Rep +25
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    And now i should be glad i am not living in UK?

  9. News (Archive)   -   #9
    so what systems will this concern, will it be file sharing programs such as limewire and kazaa and torrents - surely thats the only way people will get caught for sharing? what about things like rapidshare etc with SSL, is there a way for them to cut internet off for these users if they downloaded, surely ssl would make sure the connection is secure so isps cant view data?

  10. News (Archive)   -   #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ploopsy View Post
    This will be good news for all the non UK based seedbox providers.
    Shame there is so few of those who what are decent and out of UK

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