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Thread: How Much Can I Put On A Dvd

  1. #1
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    Can I burn more than the 120 minutes blank DVDs say?

    I just made my first DVD but it was only ~90 minutes.

    I want to burn 27 20 minute Anime episodes (.hack//SIGN) (it works out to 9 hours) to DVD. Is there any way to use a lower bitrate to get it all on one, or two, DVD-R's?

  2. Movies & TV   -   #2
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    i think muchspl2 said something before about a kdvd.... tsk tsk

  3. Movies & TV   -   #3
    Samurai's Avatar Usenet Fanboy
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    Visit Doom9.

    They have full guides explaining everything you ever needed to know about this sort of thing. Unfortunately I'm still learning myself, but this is where I'm getting my info from. Pop in their forums sometime too. They'll be happy to help.

    Samurai

  4. Movies & TV   -   #4
    DVD supports the resolutions 720x480 and 352x480, i think. you can also stretch your running time by fiddling around with the MPEG-2 bitrate, and by using MP2-format audio rather than WAV. you can go well beyond 2 hours with a blank DVD.

    they prolly just decided on 120 minutes as an estimate of how much video you can fit at 720x480 with a "full quality" MPEG-2 bitrate.

    TmpgEnc's project wizard gives a pretty straightforward explanation of DVD-video encoding choices.

  5. Movies & TV   -   #5
    muchspl2
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    I haven't done it yet, only cause I lack a dvdr , but kdvd is supposed to give 6 hours dvd quality, and 10 hours svcd quality
    its worth looking into @ http://www.kvcd.net

  6. Movies & TV   -   #6
    Robert00000's Avatar Interweb Fantasist BT Rep: +1
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    Originally posted by muchspl2@17 December 2003 - 14:00
    I haven't done it yet, only cause I lack a dvdr , but kdvd is supposed to give 6 hours dvd quality, and 10 hours svcd quality
    its worth looking into @ http://www.kvcd.net
    If you are going to convert to kdvd make sure your dvd player can play it properly. so, do a test first, i've had some pixelation probs with this format, so i dont use it.

    You can try to shrink the movies using dvd2one, and see if the quality is acceptable. I've put three movies (4 hours total) using dvd2one without lossing noticable quality, and the disk is compaitble with all dvd players (that can play dvd r).

    If you want to use dvd2one author your movie first (to whatever size it becomes)and then use this software to reduce it to 4.36 Gb.

    One important notice: Make sure you use variable bitrate when authoring dvd's for any purpose, because it preserves more quality by shifting higher bitrates to action sequences and lower to static and close up sequences.
    Robert00000

  7. Movies & TV   -   #7
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    One important notice: Make sure you use variable bitrate when authoring dvd's for any purpose, because it preserves more quality by shifting higher bitrates to action sequences and lower to static and close up sequences.
    Not realy true mate.You can match & better quality using cbr.Plus half the time to encode.

    The main reason to use vbr is if you really need to hit an exact size.If your not its better to use cbr mate just to save your self hrs of encoding ,you'll only be afew mb out which is normally not a prob with dvdr's

  8. Movies & TV   -   #8
    Robert00000's Avatar Interweb Fantasist BT Rep: +1
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    Originally posted by ck-uk@17 December 2003 - 17:11
    The main reason to use vbr is if you really need to hit an exact size.If your not its better to use cbr mate just to save your self hrs of encoding ,you'll only be afew mb out which is normally not a prob with dvdr's
    You've got the two the wrong way around.

    VBR = variable bit rate = unpredicatble file size and the bits are shifted to where its needed (i.e complex sequences, so no/less pixelation or fuzziness). Takes less space for same quality, thats why its used.

    CBR = Constant bit rate = file size is spot on because using the same bits per second all the way through the movie. Takes more space for the same quality than VBR.

    VBR is the logical choice for DVD and SVCD movies as they both support it. VCD's on the other hand can only use CBR and at a fixed bitrate, thats why they are crap quality.
    Robert00000

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