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Thread: Peerguardian Blocks, Should I Worry?

  1. #1
    Hey all i seem to get sony on my case lately trying to get into me comp, isn't that illegal to do that?


    Just wondering if i should be worried or not & pack me bags to run


    Here's what i'am getting:~
    [list][*]Successfully loaded 361426591 IPs from 3508 profiles.
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 12:56:20)
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 12:56:20)
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 13:00:21)
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 13:00:21)
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 13:13:20)
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 13:13:20)
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 13:54:02)


    Can go on forever..anyway what you think, anyother protection i can get?

    i have a firewall (zonealarm) & this peerguardian

  2. BitTorrent   -   #2
    Interesting. Well, I don't use software firewalls, but I hear Peergaurdian is real good. Seems like it's workin.

    If you want more protection, invest in hardware, instead. For example, I have a network of computers, and the easiest way to protect them all was through hardware. I got an old computer and I turned it into a server, by putting a version of linux made just for that, and my bro got a router and set up a NAT, and VPN. This masks the IP addresses of my systems.

    Softwarewise... I don't know. lol.

    -- Xero Grid --
    <span style='color:green'>Supertrick XG Forums</span> | Supertrick XG - Your solution to ads, pop-ups, malicious code, and the rest of the garbage just floating around the web.

  3. BitTorrent   -   #3
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    Originally posted by Maximus359+30 January 2004 - 17:57--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Maximus359 &#064; 30 January 2004 - 17:57)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Hey all i seem to get sony on my case lately trying to get into me comp, isn&#39;t that illegal to do that?

    Just wondering if i should be worried or not & pack me bags to run

    Here&#39;s what i&#39;am getting:~
    [LIST][*]Successfully loaded 361426591 IPs from 3508 profiles.
    [LIST][*]Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 12:56:20)

    Can go on forever..anyway what you think, anyother protection i can get?[/b]
    If Peer Guardian blocked it, you can worry a LOT less&#33;

    If you&#39;re not downloading a torrent which Sony controls the copyright to, then you have little to fear. It is not illegal for them to connect to you via NORMAL means. They cannot use programs illegally (viruses, trojans, some spyware types) to hack into your computer -- but if you GIVE them access via a PUBLIC file-sharing system like Kazaa, BitTorrent, Shareaza, Emule, Mirc, etc -- then they can legally connect to you via those programs (they can get into trouble for hacking file-sharing networks if they&#39;re not going through standard programs/methods on them) and check out whatever it is you&#39;re sharing. In short, they could legally learn about as much about you as you can find out about other users on the same network. They MAY even be legally forbidden from using as legal evidence (although this may not stop them from gathering it or threatening you with it) information gained using &#39;3rd party&#39;/&#39;unsupported&#39; software for a file-sharing network. So if they made their own &#39;Kazaa monitoring program&#39;, they may not be able to use evidence gained through it in a court of law unless they can prove their program does not &#39;violate privacy&#39; or another company&#39;s copyrights. Sharman, makers of Kazaa, ARE arguing that their &#39;tools&#39; do infringe on their copyrights (and maybe even patents) -- so who knows if it actually gets to a real courtroom instead of settled out-of-court for &#036;1-20 k? Being in court though tends to cost &#036;1-20 k per DAY if you have a hired lawyer helping you -- you are only entitled to a court-appointed lawyer in the USA if it&#39;s a CRIMINAL case, and copyright infrinement usually isn&#39;t.

    You are legally entitled to block listing of your shared files on many file-sharing networks or even block ip ranges (what Peer Guardian does), which can lower your risk assuming you are doing something THEY would consider illegal.

    I think there&#39;s at least 1 BitTorrent clone out now (A-something) that can internally block ip connections using its own blocklist. This would be greater protection than using Peer Guardian separately... and should be faster too. Peer Guardian is reactive -- a connection has to be attempted or ALREADY MADE before it can attempt to break the connection. The built-in blocker can prevent a connection from being made in the first place. As far as I know, Peer Guardian cannot block UDP packets AT ALL, while some types of internal ip blockers (for various programs) can.<!--QuoteBegin-Xero Grid
    @30 January 2004 - 21:46
    I got an old computer and I turned it into a server, by putting a version of linux made just for that, and my bro got a router and set up a NAT, and VPN. This masks the IP addresses of my systems.[/quote]Your ips may in fact NOT be masked, despite your setup, at least while using some programs.

    Depending on the kind of VPN, it is still possible (maybe even easy) to determine where the source ip is. It probably isn&#39;t possible if the VPN goes through a remote proxy server, but if the &#39;proxy server&#39; is on the same ip as you then that&#39;s still giving out your ip address.

    For virtually all TCP/ip connections, both the source ip and destination are known unless passing through secure and remote proxy servers.

    UDP connections on the other hand only reveal the destination ip -- but UDP is often blocked by university and company firewalls due to the security risks associated (often incorrectly) with them.

    Some file-sharing programs have semi-intelligent internet (WAN) ip address identification and share that information with WHOEVER connects to them through the file-sharing network they&#39;re on.

    Kazaa/KL++ fortunately doesn&#39;t -- but this means if you&#39;re behind a NAT/router then your ip address is mistakenly identified by Kazaa/KL++ to be you LAN ip rather than your internet (WAN) ip. Port-forwarding PLUS KaNAT is required to mostly rectify this matter. Otherwise, you cannot download from or upload to any firewalled (to Kazaa/KL++) connection.

  4. BitTorrent   -   #4
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    Originally posted by Maximus359@30 January 2004 - 21:57
    • Connection Rejected: 195.2.39.140 - Sony Enterprise registry (01-30-2004 @ 12:56:20)
    http://www.whois.sc/195.2.39.140

    IP Location: Germany - Sony Europe Front Network

    Shock, horror, Peer Guardian has worked
    On a given day or given circumstance, you think you have a limit.
    And you then go for this limit and you touch this limit and you think &quot;Ok, this is the limit&quot;.
    As soon as you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further.
    With your mind power, your determination, your instinct and the experience as well, you can fly very high.

    - Ayrton Senna, R.I.P.

  5. BitTorrent   -   #5
    Well, I didn&#39;t want to get too technical, but, yep, you&#39;re right.

    -- Xero Grid --
    <span style='color:green'>Supertrick XG Forums</span> | Supertrick XG - Your solution to ads, pop-ups, malicious code, and the rest of the garbage just floating around the web.

  6. BitTorrent   -   #6
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    Maybe people at Sony like to download stuff from BitTorent when they&#39;re bored.

  7. BitTorrent   -   #7
    Originally posted by stupidguy@31 January 2004 - 09:25
    Maybe people at Sony like to download stuff from BitTorent when they&#39;re bored.
    HAHAHA.
    The funny thing is, it may not be far from the truth.

    -- Xero Grid --
    <span style='color:green'>Supertrick XG Forums</span> | Supertrick XG - Your solution to ads, pop-ups, malicious code, and the rest of the garbage just floating around the web.

  8. BitTorrent   -   #8
    Corporations like Sony use software similar to MediaDefender which actually DO download from BT and P2P clients, but only with intentions of using up YOUR bandwidth when it could be going to those who actually want the file. This technique is known as interdiction. Though I should be using such extreme measures as that guy with the VPN and NAT hardware, I lack the funds and time to do so. I also use only PeerGuardian and rely upon it for my anti-anti-Piracy needs. By the way, anyone got an ETA on when it will support UDP? Thanks.

    I find it fun to look up these companies that try to connect to me and see how THEY go about trying to stop pirates. But hey, that&#39;s just nerdy me.

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