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Thread: Yet Another Report That Shows That P2p

  1. #1
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    Music Sales Strong Despite Digital Piracy


    Online file-sharing and other digital piracy persist, but a gradual turnaround in U.S. music sales that began last fall picked up in the first quarter of this year, resulting in the industry's best domestic sales in years.

    Overall U.S. music sales ó CDs, legal downloads, DVDs, etc. ó rose 9.1 percent in the first three months of the year over the same period in 2003, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

    Album sales were up 9.2 percent. Sales of CDs, which represent 96 percent of album sales, rose 10.6 percent. For the first time since 2000, two recording artists ó Norah Jones and Usher ó managed to sell more than 1 million copies of their albums in a single week.

    "We've had a big run so far," said Geoff Mayfield, director of charts and senior analyst for Billboard Magazine. "Because we've had three years of erosion, at least for the first eight months of the year, it will be relatively easy for the industry to post increases."

    The sales data are a bolt of encouragement to an industry hit by a three-year sales slump it blames largely on file-sharing. The downturn prompted a wave of restructuring by record companies and thousands of layoffs.

    Cary Sherman, president of the Recording Industry Association of America, called the first-quarter figures "good news," but cautioned that the results were measured against a dismal period.

    "The numbers of 2003 were down about 10 percent to 12 percent from the year before," Sherman said. "If we didn't have that kind of increase it would be really terrible."

    U.S. album sales declined annually in the three years following 2000, the biggest year since Nielsen SoundScan began tracking U.S. music sales.

    In 2001, sales were down 3 percent. The next year, sales dropped 11 percent. Last year, until September, sales were down 8.5 percent, but the pickup in sales at the end of the year narrowed the total decline for 2003 to less than 4 percent.

    The burgeoning online music market accounted for the sale of more than 25 million tracks between January and March, eclipsing the 19.2 million tracks purchased in the last six months of 2003, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

    Stores also saw gains. Chain stores' music sales were up 7 percent, while independent music retailers saw a 3 percent increase. Discount chains such as Wal-Mart, Target and Kmart posted a 13 percent jump in sales compared to the same period last year, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

    "There were a couple of major releases that certainly pushed this quarter," said Jesse Klempner, owner of Aron's Records in Hollywood. "It's been down the last two years, this is an upswing."

    Industry observers said no single factor has driven the turnaround.

    Mayfield sees similarities with the industry's slump 20 years ago.

    Sales of disco music dried up after the dance scene fell out of vogue in the early 1980s. In the late 1990s, the Backstreet Boys, 'N Sync and Britney Spears drew millions of teenage fans who had been out of the music marketplace, but sales didn't keep up as the audience got older.

    "That music was hot and nothing moved in to replace it," Mayfield said.

    He also draws comparisons between the loss of eight-track sales in the early 1980s and the more recent phasing out of cassettes, a format that provided customers with a cheaper alternative to CDs.

    The early 1980s and the early part of this decade were also marked by economic downturns. Conversely, the music industry was better able to weather the recession in the early 1990s because of CD sales driven by consumers replacing their vinyl record and cassette tape collections.

    Still, the recording industry has focused on Internet piracy, and its trade group cites surveys that indicate the number of people engaging in file-sharing has declined since the group began suing computer users.
    Shut that cuntís mouth or Iíll come over there and fuckstart her head.

  2. File Sharing   -   #2
    dude. there is no way to PROVE that filesharing hurts or doesn't hurt sales. it's impossible to measure.

    if every single person in the entire world bought a copy of the latest album by ___________, the music industry would be angry that everyone didn't buy 5 copies.

  3. File Sharing   -   #3
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    Originally posted by 3RA1N1AC@12 April 2004 - 20:01
    dude. there is no way to PROVE that filesharing hurts or doesn't hurt sales. it's impossible to measure.

    if every single person in the entire world bought a copy of the latest album by ___________, the music industry would be angry that everyone didn't buy 5 copies.
    it is very possible to measure. There has been god only knows how many research projects into finding out whether it affects sales or not and the vast majority say that p2p programs do not affect sale. I think i am right in quoting that one report recently said that it would take 500 000 downloads of one album to decrease the number of bought copies by ONE cd...
    Shut that cuntís mouth or Iíll come over there and fuckstart her head.

  4. File Sharing   -   #4
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    I'm sorry for sounding blunt here but use your brain...

    x decides he likes D12, x decides he wants to buy D12's album. x can't be fucked to spend £16 he'd rather spend it on weed and download the album for free off the internet... x downloads it for free thus stopping him from lining them fat cats with another £16...

    Trust me theres lot's of x's about.. prolly about 100,000 of them on this board me included
    I wasn't going to buy it in the first place, so me downloading it for free isn't losing them any money.

  5. File Sharing   -   #5
    Originally posted by hungrylilboy@12 April 2004 - 14:15
    it is very possible to measure. There has been god only knows how many research projects into finding out whether it affects sales or not and the vast majority say that p2p programs do not affect sale. I think i am right in quoting that one report recently said that it would take 500 000 downloads of one album to decrease the number of bought copies by ONE cd...
    ooh, we're playing the "my emoticon expresses my opinion of how stupid you are" game now?

    okay, here goes. :rtfm: :pirate:

    these researchers use, what, random sample surveys to determine how sales are affected or unaffected? you have to put a lot of blind faith in their testing methods, the relevance of their samples, and the honesty of the respondants in order to believe that these surveys can say with 100% certainty that people wouldn't buy music if they couldn't download it for free.

    for instance, you claim that 500,000 downloads is equal to one purchase, because a report said so. that's awfully speculative, to think that if downloads weren't available then only one person out of 500,000 who want to hear it in the first place would actually go out and buy it.

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