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Thread: Power Line Networks.

  1. #1
    tesco's Avatar woowoo
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    Was looking at this on tigerdirect.ca and it got me thinking, the network must be able to travel through the power lines pretty well since there are a lot of them in your house, so they must also go trhough the different fuses in your fuse box, what stops people in other houses from being able to connect to your network from their power lines? doesn't make sense that the network doesn't leave your fuse box...or does it?

    is it like wifi that you need to put in a security code to access the network or something like that, or is it more like ethernet?

  2. Software & Hardware   -   #2
    lynx's Avatar .
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    I suppose it works exactly the same as cable.

    Everyone in the contention group gets the same feed, but it is differentiated according to your mac address. That's why cable users have to tell their ISP when their mac address changes.

    Edit: there's no privacy on the internet anyway, someone can always break in, it just may not be your neighbour. Unless you are using secure sockets.
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  3. Software & Hardware   -   #3
    tesco's Avatar woowoo
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    Originally posted by lynx@22 June 2004 - 22:40
    I suppose it works exactly the same as cable.

    Everyone in the contention group gets the same feed, but it is differentiated according to your mac address. That's why cable users have to tell their ISP when their mac address changes.

    Edit: there's no privacy on the internet anyway, someone can always break in, it just may not be your neighbour. Unless you are using secure sockets.
    I see, but cable is internet, or can u get cable networks now too? lol.

    cable lines all get broken up at little boxes outside houses where teh cable lines are controlled by some switcheroo box thingy lol. The power lines, if i am not mistaken, from every house are exactly the same connection, only thing telling them apart is teh meter that tells you how many KWh you use...

  4. Software & Hardware   -   #4
    tesco's Avatar woowoo
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    while we're here, can someone reassure me with something...

    First i planned to buy this.

    But today i just saw this. It is only 3 dollars more, seems like a good deal (im aware it is recertified (meaning refurbished right?)).

    My question is: will two routers work ok together? i already have a dlink di-704P and I am unsure if two routers on one network will work.

    Im thinking, it should, why not? but does it? lol.

  5. Software & Hardware   -   #5
    Virtualbody1234's Avatar Forum Star BT Rep: +2
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    Yes, you can use two router together. One has to have its routing part disabled to work as a hub. I have only done this once. I used an online guide (don't remember where it was, searched google).

    Don't buy a wireless unless you intend to use the wireless capability.

  6. Software & Hardware   -   #6
    lynx's Avatar .
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    Firstly, the power line idea, obviously there is a box to take the network signal off the power line, AFAIK this also performs the same function as the little box outside the house in the case of cable.

    Secondly, I've never seen a router with the routing disabled (or even one where you could do that). That would make it a switch or hub, so what would be the point? I suggest just getting the switch.
    .
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  7. Software & Hardware   -   #7
    tesco's Avatar woowoo
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    Originally posted by lynx@22 June 2004 - 23:08
    Firstly, the power line idea, obviously there is a box to take the network signal off the power line, AFAIK this also performs the same function as the little box outside the house in the case of cable.

    Secondly, I've never seen a router with the routing disabled (or even one where you could do that). That would make it a switch or hub, so what would be the point? I suggest just getting the switch.
    cause I plan to use the wireless...

    Just simply plugging the lan port of the router to teh lan port of the other router wouldn't work?

  8. Software & Hardware   -   #8
    lynx's Avatar .
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    Originally posted by ROSSCO_2004+23 June 2004 - 04:18--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (ROSSCO_2004 @ 23 June 2004 - 04:18)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-lynx@22 June 2004 - 23:08
    Firstly, the power line idea, obviously there is a box to take the network signal off the power line, AFAIK this also performs the same function as the little box outside the house in the case of cable.

    Secondly, I&#39;ve never seen a router with the routing disabled (or even one where you could do that). That would make it a switch or hub, so what would be the point? I suggest just getting the switch.
    cause I plan to use the wireless...

    Just simply plugging the lan port of the router to teh lan port of the other router wouldn&#39;t work? [/b][/quote]
    What was I thinking?
    Yes, that would work.

    You realise it is only 802.11b? 11 Mbps max speed.
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  9. Software & Hardware   -   #9
    tesco's Avatar woowoo
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    Originally posted by lynx+22 June 2004 - 23:29--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (lynx @ 22 June 2004 - 23:29)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
    Originally posted by ROSSCO_2004@23 June 2004 - 04:18
    <!--QuoteBegin-lynx
    @22 June 2004 - 23:08
    Firstly, the power line idea, obviously there is a box to take the network signal off the power line, AFAIK this also performs the same function as the little box outside the house in the case of cable.

    Secondly, I&#39;ve never seen a router with the routing disabled (or even one where you could do that). That would make it a switch or hub, so what would be the point? I suggest just getting the switch.

    cause I plan to use the wireless...

    Just simply plugging the lan port of the router to teh lan port of the other router wouldn&#39;t work?
    What was I thinking?
    Yes, that would work.

    You realise it is only 802.11b? 11 Mbps max speed. [/b][/quote]
    ya, i know lol, not so slow though i used my friends and seems pretty fast, mostly just use the net so it won&#39;t make a difference. besides, the wired portion of the router still runs 100mbps doesn&#39;t it?

    so this will work? u sure?

  10. Software & Hardware   -   #10
    Virtualbody1234's Avatar Forum Star BT Rep: +2
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    u sure?
    Not sure. As I said I did it once (quite some time ago) with a completely different router and it wasn&#39;t easy. In fact, it was a pain. If you can get away without wireless then just go with your first idea. Much simpler.

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