Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Favorite Fantasy Authors?

  1. #1
    TheNobleEU's Avatar Post Count Slacker
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    68
    What's everyone's favorite fantasy author?

    People I like:

    Glen Cook (Black Company)
    Raymond E Feist (Serpent War Saga)
    Terry Brooks (Shannara)

    People I don't like:

    Robert Jordon (series drug out much too long)
    RA Salvatore (Drizzt can't live forever bub)
    JRR Tolkien (LOTR should be seen, not read)


    There are a lot out there that I haven't read, so let's get some comments from the fans of the following:

    Tad Williams
    David Eddings
    Michael Moorcock
    Terry Prachett
    Mercedes Lackey (like LOTR, mostly for children?)
    Terry Goodkind

    etc. Not even sure whether all those names belong in the same column, but whenever I go into a bookstore, I seem to find more fantasy authors. Any opinions on the above? Which other authors deserve mention?

    Anyone recommend authors similar to those I like above?

    Cheers,
    -EU

  2. Lounge   -   #2
    Guillaume's Avatar Kentish old lady BT Rep: +8BT Rep +8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    7,763
    [fanboy mode] Too bad you don't like Tolkien, I won't talk to you! [/fanboy mode]



    So let's start with Terry Pratchett: writes a parodic heroic-fantasy, filled with non-sensical humor and puns by the shovelful. One of the very few authors who get better with every volume of a series (30 or so Discworld books and counting&#33 A must have!

    David (and Leigh, his wife) Eddings: Writes a very classic fantasy with many cliché characters ( the wizard, the thief the warrior and so on), but amazingly finds a way to make them refreshing ( the sorcerer Belgarath has absolutely nothing in common with Gandalf: he's a drunk, womanizing, thieving old man...). Their intrigues however are always of the "group of heroes against evil god" type... So, nothing really original, but a good read nonetheless if you're not looking for a masterpiece.

    You should read Georges RR Martin's "Ice and Fire books", but I'll let MagicNakor do the introduction...

    oooh, time to eat, will post more later!

  3. Lounge   -   #3
    MagicNakor's Avatar On the Peripheral
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    5,401
    While Drizzt can't live forever, barring any unnatural death he *can* live for around 350 years, which, compared to his companions, is forever. Unless he happens to come across an elven companion. Drow don't live as long as surface elves. Anyway. That's your D&D trivia for today.

    George R.R. Martin is the "latest and greatest" on the fantasy scene right now. His Song of Ice and Fire books are very good indeed (even if A Feast for Crows is taking bloody forever to write, dammit&#33, and I'd certainly recommend reading them. You can get them for fairly cheaply now too...I got Storm of Swords for $12 hardcorver.

    Terry Goodkind does the Sword of Truth series. It's interesting for the first few books, but it starts to repeat itself and become terribly preachy. After the last one, I doubt I'll be reading any more of them. Too bad...if he had decided to have a close-ended series (see Song of Ice and Fire ) it would've been far better.

    I'm not much of a fan of Michael Moorcock's, Mercedes Lackey's, or Terry Pratchett. Sometimes Pratchett's alright. Lackey bores me to tears.

    things are quiet until hitler decides he'd like to invade russia
    so, he does
    the russians are like "OMG WTF D00DZ, STOP TKING"
    and the germans are still like "omg ph34r n00bz"
    the russians fall back, all the way to moscow
    and then they all begin h4xing, which brings on the russian winter
    the germans are like "wtf, h4x"
    -- WW2 for the l33t

  4. Lounge   -   #4
    uNz[i]'s Avatar Out of order
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,259
    Tolkien is better read than watched, imo.

    Definately give Pratchett a go.
    Hugh Cook, well I loved his Chronicles of an age of Darkness series. 10 books in all.

    If you want to try something very different from the norm, seek out the works of Robert Rankin. He's the only author who can always make Pratchett laugh, apparently.

    ...and the missus strongly recommends David Gemmell.

    Edit: typo

  5. Lounge   -   #5
    TheNobleEU's Avatar Post Count Slacker
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    68
    Discworld is sci-fi, no?

    Does anyone have a listing of Edding's books in the order in which they should be read?


    While Drizzt can't live forever, barring any unnatural death he *can* live for around 350 years, which, compared to his companions, is forever.
    Oh gawd, no!


    Terry Goodkind does the Sword of Truth series. It's interesting for the first few books, but it starts to repeat itself and become terribly preachy.
    Ah, like the Wheel of Time. Not my thing.

    I'm looking for something in Medieval-D&D type fantasy, that breaks the mold and gets away from the endless cliches. The authors I listed (Cook & Feist) did this for me.

    Cheers,
    -EU

  6. Lounge   -   #6
    MagicNakor's Avatar On the Peripheral
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    5,401
    Depending on your tolerance level for puns, Piers Anthony's Xanth series can be a fun romp. Incarnations of Immortality is decent too.

    Gotta go into town right now, but I'll edit/add when I get back.

    things are quiet until hitler decides he'd like to invade russia
    so, he does
    the russians are like "OMG WTF D00DZ, STOP TKING"
    and the germans are still like "omg ph34r n00bz"
    the russians fall back, all the way to moscow
    and then they all begin h4xing, which brings on the russian winter
    the germans are like "wtf, h4x"
    -- WW2 for the l33t

  7. Lounge   -   #7
    Guillaume's Avatar Kentish old lady BT Rep: +8BT Rep +8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    7,763
    Originally posted by TheNobleEU@14 August 2004 - 02:39
    Discworld is sci-fi, no?
    Nope, definitely Fantasy, although Pratchett sometimes mixes modern concepts into a world filled with dwarves, wizards and so on...

    Does anyone have a listing of Edding's books in the order in which they should be read?
    Sure:
    Now, most of Eddings series come into twos ( The belgariad and the malloreon , The elenium and the tamuli).

    A) The Belgariad
    1) Pawn of prophecy
    2) Queen of sorcery
    3) Magician's gambit
    4) Castle of wizardry
    5) Enchanter's end game

    followed by

    B ) The Malloreon
    1) Guardians of the west
    2) King of the murgos
    3) Demon lord of Karanda
    4) Sorceress of Darshiva
    5) The Seeress of Kell

    Prequels to the Belgariad and Malloreon:
    1) Belgarath the sorcerer
    2) Polgara the sorceress

    C) The Elenium
    1) The diamond throne
    2) The ruby knight
    3) The sapphire rose

    D) The Tamuli
    1) Domes of fire
    2) The shining ones
    3) The hidden city

    E) The redemption of Althalus

    F) The Dreamers
    1) The elder gods
    2) The treasured one (not published yet)

  8. Lounge   -   #8
    Poster
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    9,946
    In the fantasy Genre

    The Thomas Covenant Books are really rather good - Stephen Donaldson.

    The Many Coloured Land (and sequels) - Julian May. Also highly recommended.

    Terry Pratchett is very much more Fantasy then Sci Fi, at least if you speak of the Discworld novels.

  9. Lounge   -   #9
    DanB's Avatar Smoke weed everyday
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    London, so fuck y'all
    Age
    38
    Posts
    22,104
    Originally posted by Gurahl@14 August 2004 - 11:47


    A) The Belgariad
    1) Pawn of prophecy
    2) Queen of sorcery
    3) Magician's gambit
    4) Castle of wizardry
    5) Enchanter's end game

    followed by

    B ) The Malloreon
    1) Guardians of the west
    2) King of the murgos
    3) Demon lord of Karanda
    4) Sorceress of Darshiva
    5) The Seeress of Kell

    I own those books. I really like David Eddings although I didn't like some of the ones after those two series for some reason

  10. Lounge   -   #10
    Cheese's Avatar Poster
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    is everything.
    Age
    40
    Posts
    19,023
    Originally posted by J'Pol@15 August 2004 - 22:00
    The Thomas Covenant Books are really rather good - Stephen Donaldson.
    Superb books, I know I've said it before but The Gap Series is one of my favourite series of books ever.

    I even did a project on the books for college, shame I don't have it here else I'd bore you all to death by posting it.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •