Your Ad Here Your Ad Here
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Applying Thermal Paste

  1. #1
    S!X's Avatar L33T Member BT Rep: +5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7,734
    Well, Times winding down before I go to florida and get all the sexy hardware you can image for my new comp. This might sound like a n00b question but ive never done it before, so could some1 please explain how-to and any pointers/precautions would be good also
    Last edited by S!X; 06-19-2005 at 10:24 AM.

  2. Software & Hardware   -   #2
    Mivaro's Avatar _________
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by Linkin Park
    Well, Times winding down before I go to florida and get all the sexy hardware you can image for my new comp. This might sound like a n00b question but ive never done it before, so could some1 please explain how-to and any pointers/precautions would be good also

    Check this link
    'English impaired'

  3. Software & Hardware   -   #3
    lynx's Avatar .
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Yorkshire, England
    Posts
    9,810
    If you are getting the retail cpu it will come with a pad already attached to the heatsink, so you don't need paste unless you absolutely insist on using it.

    If you do want to use paste, you have to remove the pad first. Scrape it off with something soft - an old credit card or something which won't scratch the base of the heatsink - then thoroughly clean it with a solvent such as rubbing alcohol.

    For applying the new paste to 939 processors (or any processor with a heat spreader), I find the best way is to apply a tiny speck in each corner of the heat spreader, then put the heatsink in place (without fastening the clips). Remove the heatsink and you can see where the processor will touch it.

    Now put a small drop of paste in the middle, then spread it to cover the contact area. Work it in to fill any microscopic pits in the surface of the heatsink - a piece if kitchen roll is ok for this. Don't use your finger - it has grease on it. When you've finished you should hardly know that there's any paste on there.

    Now go back to the processor, and apply a very thin film to the top of the heat spreader - that old credit card it useful again (as long as you cleaned it). Put the heatsink in place (still without fastening the clips) then twist it a few degrees in each direction. Remove it and check that you've got even coverage of the paste over the contact area. You can even slide the heatsink around a couple of millimetres if necessary. Note - don't do this on processors without a heat spreader - you may damage the core.

    If the layer is thin enough you will probably be ably to see the writing on the heat spreader through the paste. Once you are happy with it put the heatsink in place any fasten the clips.

    You can leave it at this point if you wish, but I like to go a little further. I usually remove the heatsink again. The contact area is easy to see, and around the edge there will probably be a ridge of paste which has been forced out. I like to clean off this excess paste (and any around the heat spreader on the cpu) but it can be a bit fiddly and probably doesn't give any benefits. It just looks better next time the heatsink is removed.
    Last edited by lynx; 06-19-2005 at 11:07 AM.
    .
    Political correctness is based on the principle that it's possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

  4. Software & Hardware   -   #4
    S!X's Avatar L33T Member BT Rep: +5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7,734

    Surprised/Amazed

    Thx for your replies, Very helpful. I plan on getting one of these badboys

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v7...ni-freezer.jpg

    (Arctic Cooling Freezer64), I dont plan on using the stock heatsink/fan. Since clocker has one of these maybe this might be a good question for him

  5. Software & Hardware   -   #5
    clocker's Avatar Shovel Ready
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    15,388
    Lynx's explanation was as succinct and comprehensive as could be.
    I have nothing to add but this warning....

    Because the new AMD chips have the integrated heat spreader (unlike the bare core Athlons) there is quite a lot of contact area between the sink and the CPU.
    With the thermal paste properly applied the HS has a very good grip (suction, almost) on the CPU.
    If you are going to do as Lynx suggested and remove the sink a few times, watch out you don't rip the chip/HS combo right out of the socket.

    Hold the HS flat as you release the cam-lock arm.
    With the retention brackets free, rotate the heatsink in a circular fashion to break the seal between the HS and the chip, then remove it.

    The pins on the 939 chips are much thinner and more fragile than older chips and will not tolerate the handling that a socketA CPU would.
    These pins tend to break off rather than bend.

    In case you didn't know...that's a BAD thing.
    Last edited by clocker; 06-19-2005 at 11:57 AM.
    "I am the one who knocks."- Heisenberg

  6. Software & Hardware   -   #6
    S!X's Avatar L33T Member BT Rep: +5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7,734
    Quote Originally Posted by clocker
    Lynx's explanation was as succinct and comprehensive as could be.
    I have nothing to add but this warning....

    Because the new AMD chips have the integrated heat spreader (unlike the bare core Athlons) their is quite a lot of contact area between the sink and the CPU.
    With the thermal paste properly applied the HS has a very good grip (suction, almost) on the CPU.
    If you are going to do as Lynx suggested and remove the sink a few times, watch out you don't rip the chip/HS combo right out of the socket.
    Alright, lynx's explination is kinda hard for me to understand. Would it work if you just put a little bit in the middle and spread it around with a bag on your hand, and then put the HS/F on? like in that link Mivaro posted?

  7. Software & Hardware   -   #7
    clocker's Avatar Shovel Ready
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    15,388
    I put a few small drops of Arctic Silver on the chip and use a single sided razor blade to spread it to a fine coating.
    The excess that gathers on the blade I then spread on the base of the HS.

    I then clamp the HSF down and call it a day.
    "I am the one who knocks."- Heisenberg

  8. Software & Hardware   -   #8
    S!X's Avatar L33T Member BT Rep: +5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7,734

    Surprised/Amazed

    Quote Originally Posted by clocker
    I put a few small drops of Arctic Silver on the chip and use a single sided razor blade to spread it to a fine coating.
    The excess that gathers on the blade I then spread on the base of the HS.

    I then clamp the HSF down and call it a day.
    Thats interesting, and it works perfectly? The razor doesnt screw up the chip? And how THIN does the layer have to be?
    Last edited by S!X; 06-19-2005 at 12:09 PM.

  9. Software & Hardware   -   #9
    clocker's Avatar Shovel Ready
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    15,388
    Quote Originally Posted by Linkin Park

    Thats interesting, and it works perfectly? The razor doesnt screw up the chip? And how THIN does the layer have to be?
    Of course not.
    You hold the blade ( or the credit card) at an angle ( approx. 45 degrees) and just pull it across the CPU...you're NOT gouging into the metal.
    Like icing a cake, really.

    How thick the layer must be depends on how flat your surfaces are.
    It's likely that the Arctic Freezer will be fine, but I've read/seen that the heatspreader on the AMD chips is not particularly flat.
    Some people lap their chips, others remove the heatspreader altogether.
    "I am the one who knocks."- Heisenberg

  10. Software & Hardware   -   #10
    S!X's Avatar L33T Member BT Rep: +5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7,734
    Quote Originally Posted by clocker
    Quote Originally Posted by Linkin Park

    Thats interesting, and it works perfectly? The razor doesnt screw up the chip? And how THIN does the layer have to be?
    Of course not.
    You hold the blade ( or the credit card) at an angle ( approx. 45 degrees) and just pull it across the CPU...you're NOT gouging into the metal.
    Like icing a cake, really.

    How thick the layer must be depends on how flat your surfaces are.
    It's likely that the Arctic Freezer will be fine, but I've read/seen that the heatspreader on the AMD chips is not particularly flat.
    Some people lap their chips, others remove the heatspreader altogether.
    So how would you know if you have too much on? If you put the HSF on and a whole bunch of it comes our the sides?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •